Conventions on Nomenclature and Practices

In summary, the conversation involves a question about the existence of a professional standards group that recommends practices and nomenclature in the life science fields, specifically in regards to a standard definition of femur length. The person asking the question is trying to distinguish between two species and is concerned about the lack of a measurement protocol in their references. They are looking for a "convention" that is understood by those in the life sciences. The conversation also mentions links to various types of mammals and suggests using the method of the original researchers or defining one's own method for data analysis.
  • #1
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Google "IUPAB" and get http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...nion+of+pure+and+applied+biology"&btnG=Search , a short list indicating very little activity.

Is there some sort of professional standards group recommending practices and nomenclature in the life science fields?

The specific question I have is, "Is there a 'standard' definition of femur length?" See http://www.loris-conservation.org/d...easurement/11a-figures_limb_measurements.html ,
"Leg measurements, primate standard, according to Schultz, 1929:

Thigh length (length of femur): from trochanterium summum to femorale, parallel to the longitudinal axis of femur.
Ischium-knee (Osman Hill, Phillips 1932). No exact definition given."


There's ~5% difference in the two measurements which is the difference between two species between which I'm trying to distinguish, and my references don't specify a measurement protocol, hence the question about IUPAB; is there a "convention" that is understood by people in the life sciences that I can "safely" assume?
 
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  • #3
That's what I was afraid of --- the "no."
 
  • #4
You've already reasearched cladistic values for your species - ie., since you "know" there is a 5% difference, use the method the original researchers used in papers you must have already read.

Or define your own method, unless you're going to compare your data to someone elses'. As long as you are internally consistent your data analysis will be acceptable for use amongst the species you study.
 

What are conventions on nomenclature and practices?

Conventions on nomenclature and practices refer to the agreed upon rules and guidelines for naming and conducting experiments and research in the scientific community.

Why are conventions on nomenclature and practices important?

Conventions on nomenclature and practices are important because they help to ensure that all scientists are using the same names for organisms, chemicals, and procedures. This allows for clear communication and understanding among researchers.

Who creates and enforces conventions on nomenclature and practices?

Conventions on nomenclature and practices are typically created and enforced by professional scientific societies, such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN).

What are some common conventions on nomenclature and practices?

Some common conventions include using Latin names for organisms, following a specific format for writing scientific names, and using standard units of measurement in experiments and research.

What happens if a scientist does not follow conventions on nomenclature and practices?

If a scientist does not follow conventions on nomenclature and practices, it can lead to confusion and miscommunication among other researchers. It can also make it difficult for their work to be accepted and published in scientific journals.

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