Cosmological constant as a fluid

In summary, the conversation discusses how to show that the cosmological constant can be interpreted as a perfect fluid with an equation of state w=-1. The first step is to take the Einstein equation with the cosmological constant term included, and then move that term to the side of the energy momentum tensor. It is then necessary to demonstrate that the term is equivalent to the energy momentum tensor of a perfect fluid in its rest frame. The result is that the energy and pressure of the fluid, in terms of the cosmological constant, have a ratio of -1.
  • #1
EDerkatch
14
0
Hi everyone,

If anyone could point me in the right direction with this problem I'd really appreciate it.

"Show that the cosmological constant can be interpreted as a perfect fluid having an equation of state w=-1."

I have a rough idea of how to do the second part of the proof: if the cosmological constant can be interpreted as a perfect fluid then

ρ(dot)+3(a(dot)/a)(ρ+P)=0 (conservation equation)=>ρ+P=0 due to the continuity of a perfect fluid.

But how do I show that it can be interpreted as a perfect fluid?
 
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  • #2
You have to take the Einstein equation with cosmological constant term included, move that term on the side of the energy momentum tensor and demonstrate the term looks exactly like energy momentum tensor of perfect fluid in its rest frame. Then you read off the energy and pressure of the fluid, in the rest frame, in terms of the cosmological constant and their ratio turns out to be -1. I won't say anything more than that.
 

Related to Cosmological constant as a fluid

1. What is the cosmological constant as a fluid?

The cosmological constant, also known as Lambda, is a term in Einstein's field equations of general relativity that represents a constant energy density filling space. It can also be thought of as a type of fluid that exerts a negative pressure, causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate.

2. How does the cosmological constant affect the expansion of the universe?

The cosmological constant acts as a repulsive force, causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate. This means that over time, the distance between galaxies and other celestial objects will continue to increase at an increasing rate.

3. What is the significance of the cosmological constant in cosmology?

The cosmological constant is significant in cosmology because it helps explain the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe. It is also important in understanding the overall shape, size, and fate of the universe.

4. Is the cosmological constant constant?

The term "constant" in cosmological constant can be misleading, as it does not necessarily mean that the value of Lambda remains the same over time. In fact, the value of the cosmological constant may change depending on the energy density of the universe. However, it is considered a constant in the sense that it does not vary from place to place in the universe.

5. How does the cosmological constant relate to dark energy?

The cosmological constant is often associated with dark energy, which is the unknown force causing the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. In fact, the cosmological constant is one possible explanation for dark energy, and is often used interchangeably with the term in cosmological models.

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