Covert hypnosis? How do you protect yourself from it?

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Has Brown ever been tested under controlled conditions, or do we only have youtube videos and tv shows?
According to the previous links, handshake hypnosis (something what Brown is doing) has been pioneered by Erickson, a respectable psychologist.

Here is a Scientific American take on hypnosis. An interesting read:

Using hypnosis, scientists have temporarily created hallucinations, compulsions, certain types of memory loss, false memories, and delusions in the laboratory so that these phenomena can be studied in a controlled environment.
Also Hypnotherapy is used often alleviate certain pains:

what are the medical benefits of hypnosis? A 1996 National Institutes of Health technology assessment panel judged hypnosis to be an effective intervention for alleviating pain from cancer and other chronic conditions. Voluminous clinical studies also indicate that hypnosis can reduce the acute pain experienced by patients undergoing burn-wound debridement, children enduring bone marrow aspirations and women in labor. A meta-analysis published in a recent special issue of the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, for example, found that hypnotic suggestions relieved the pain of 75 percent of 933 subjects participating in 27 different experiments. The pain-relieving effect of hypnosis is often substantial, and in a few cases the degree of relief matches or exceeds that provided by morphine.

Here is Steve G Jones, a hypnotherapist that uses these technique to help people overcome their fears. He explains how handshake hypnosis works:



Here is an actual demo:you may think this the subject is faking it but this is a real effect.
 
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  • #27
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According to the previous links, handshake hypnosis (something what Brown is doing) has been pioneered by Erickson, a respectable psychologist.
I don't understand how Brown garners respectability because of Erickson's reputation.

Here is a Scientific American take on hypnosis. An interesting read:

Using hypnosis, scientists have temporarily created hallucinations, compulsions, certain types of memory loss, false memories, and delusions in the laboratory so that these phenomena can be studied in a controlled environment.

Also Hypnotherapy is used often alleviate certain pains:

what are the medical benefits of hypnosis? A 1996 National Institutes of Health technology assessment panel judged hypnosis to be an effective intervention for alleviating pain from cancer and other chronic conditions. Voluminous clinical studies also indicate that hypnosis can reduce the acute pain experienced by patients undergoing burn-wound debridement, children enduring bone marrow aspirations and women in labor. A meta-analysis published in a recent special issue of the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, for example, found that hypnotic suggestions relieved the pain of 75 percent of 933 subjects participating in 27 different experiments. The pain-relieving effect of hypnosis is often substantial, and in a few cases the degree of relief matches or exceeds that provided by morphine.

Here is a Scientific American take on hypnosis. An interesting read:
I think you're mashing ideas together, here, waht. Isn't the opening premise of this thread about "covert hypnosis". I'm not even sure I know what that is save the ability to lull someone into a sense of security and trust with you in short order.

I have no doubts about the effectiveness of hypnosis (not sure about hypnotherapy, but I don't know enough about it to comment) because I used it myself. While "under hypnosis", which I'd say is poor wording to describe it, but common, so I'll go with it, you are perfectly aware of everything that's going on around you. It actually takes a very willing participant to do it properly and/or well and someone who knows how to focus their thoughts and concentrate well. And I never once lost sight of what was going on and actively evaluated all of the suggestions I was being given because I recall dismissing a few out of hand thinking, "No, I don't believe that". It didn't disrupt the hypnosis session, it just meant that my core beliefs weren't shaken in the process.

Having had tremendous success with hypnosis twice, I understand how it works and how the state feels and how much of my co-operation it took. Someone walking up to me on the street and using social and physical cues to quickly gain my trust I wouldn't qualify as "hypnosis" per se. Some other technique, to be certain, but not hypnosis.

Now, I realise that anecdotal evidence doesn't really play, but that's what I've got. Hypnosis itself already has a body of research behind it.
 
  • #28
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I don't understand how Brown garners respectability because of Erickson's reputation.
His confusion techniques and derivatives of handshake hypnosis are backed up by Erickson's research.

This is in response to Ivan or anyone who thinks that Derren Brown, and dozens of other street hypnotists use stooges. Where in fact, they could be really approaching someone and hypnotizing them in just few seconds.

Also, I understand that youtube may seem like a not respectable outlet in the sense that people post whatever. However, how does one explain hundreds or so videos of different people (amateurs and professionals) performing handshake hypnosis? Did they all band together and agreed to fake it?


I think you're mashing ideas together, here, waht. Isn't the[ opening premise of this thread about "covert hypnosis". I'm not even sure I know what that is save the ability to lull someone into a sense of security and trust with you in short order.
That's right, lulling someone is not the actual way of inducing a hypnotic trance, but I mentioned it because this also a way of getting people to comply.

I have no doubts about the effectiveness of hypnosis (not sure about hypnotherapy, but I don't know enough about it to comment) because I used it myself. While "under hypnosis", which I'd say is poor wording to describe it, but common, so I'll go with it, you are perfectly aware of everything that's going on around you. It actually takes a very willing participant to do it properly and/or well and someone who knows how to focus their thoughts and concentrate well. And I never once lost sight of what was going on and actively evaluated all of the suggestions I was being given because I recall dismissing a few out of hand thinking, "No, I don't believe that". It didn't disrupt the hypnosis session, it just meant that my core beliefs weren't shaken in the process.
Some people are just more suggestible than others. Stage hypnotists use different suggestibility tests to find the most prone individual in the audience. Those less suggestible need more work to get hypnotized.

Having had tremendous success with hypnosis twice, I understand how it works and how the state feels and how much of my co-operation it took. Someone walking up to me on the street and using social and physical cues to quickly gain my trust I wouldn't qualify as "hypnosis" per se. Some other technique, to be certain, but not hypnosis.
In my previous posts I didn't mean to imply gaining "trust" as a way to hypnosis, but as an alternate explanation of getting to people.
 
  • #29
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When I watch the video, I see no reason for any confusion. He just hands the stuff over. My BS meter is pegged. Why should we believe this man is confused? Brown only asked for directions. Just because we have certain techniques that can be claimed, that doesn't imply that this is what Brown is doing. What tells me that Brown isn't just feigning something that is in fact much more complicated; not so easy to do?

Has Brown ever been tested under controlled conditions, or do we only have youtube videos and tv shows?
I think all of this information about non-standard forms of hypnosis is completely new to you, and you're so eager to push forward with your original reaction to the video that you haven't given the new material it's proper due. The stuff about Erickson's confusion technique and handshake induction is necessary to understand. Try watching the handshake part of the video again and write down the sequence of events up to the taking of the watch. I just did this for myself. Had to play it over quite a few times to catch and describe each element of the handshake. It's really not a normal, straighforward handshake.

Then, if you would, read the section on handshake induction in the Wiki article about Erickson I linked you to.

Sorry to ask this of you, but I don't think you're going to grasp the paradigm of confusion hypnosis that was developed by Erickson otherwise. Once you grasp it you'll see how Derren's handshake fits perfectly neatly into it, and there's no reason to suppose he's feigning it. If it's any consolation, I once asked Fz+ a question in a thread and his answer caused me to have to read a whole book to understand the point he made in his reply.
 
  • #30
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While "under hypnosis", which I'd say is poor wording to describe it, but common, so I'll go with it, you are perfectly aware of everything that's going on around you. It actually takes a very willing participant to do it properly and/or well and someone who knows how to focus their thoughts and concentrate well. And I never once lost sight of what was going on and actively evaluated all of the suggestions I was being given because I recall dismissing a few out of hand thinking, "No, I don't believe that". It didn't disrupt the hypnosis session, it just meant that my core beliefs weren't shaken in the process.
I'm curious: did they administer a suggestibility assessment at any point? :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnotic_susceptibility

Form A

Based upon the scale developed by Joseph Friedlander and Theodore Sarbin (1938), this form was developed to measure susceptibility to hypnosis with items increasing in difficulty in order to yield a score. The higher the score, the more responsive one is to hypnosis. Following a standardized hypnotic induction, the hypnotized individual is given suggestions pertaining to the list below.
Item Number Test Suggestion and Responses
1 Postural Sway
2 Eye Closure
3 Hand Lowering (left)
4 Immobilization (right arm)
5 Finger Lock
6 Arm Rigidity (left arm)
7 Hands Moving Together
8 Verbal Inhibition (name)
9 Hallucination (fly)
10 Eye catalepsy
11 Post-hypnotic (changes chairs)
12 Amnesia
 
  • #31
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That's an interesting test list, zooby, because it sounds similar to the check-list run through by every stage magician I've ever seen perform. We had a stage hypnotist perform at one of our corporate Christmas parties, and the people from my office who participated were a) hams and uninhibited to begin with and b) reported afterwards that they were in a light trance state at the beginning of the performance but it didn't sustain throughout, even though they continued to participate. Again, all anecdotal.

The private sessions I attended that had a definitive purpose, no, didn't feature any of that "responsiveness" chart testing. I've watched documentaries discussing more modern testing involving hypnosis that's applied for practical purposes. It strikes me, though, that beliefs about hypnosis in 1938 may be out of date and fairly antiquated.

But a straight answer to your question: no, there was no suggestibility assessment administered.
 
  • #32
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But a straight answer to your question: no, there was no suggestibility assessment administered.
How do you think you'd rate, say on #9? If the hypnotist directed you to hear the sound of a fly buzzing, would you be able to hear that so vividly it would be indistinguishable from a real fly?
 
  • #33
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How do you think you'd rate, say on #9? If the hypnotist directed you to hear the sound of a fly buzzing, would you be able to hear that so vividly it would be indistinguishable from a real fly?
I can't answer that because he didn't make any attempts at redirecting my attention or calling my attention to external stimulus.

The best way that I can describe the hypnosis that I participated in was him aiding me in relaxing to the point of achieving a meditative state (now, please, I'm not being literal, here, I'm simply using words that I think can illustrate the situation) and, once I achieved that state, he then had a discussion with my "subconscious mind" to help me with behaviour modification. Once we were finished, I haven't ever experienced such an intense feeling of internal warmth and satisfaction and comfort and general sense of well being. And the behaviour modification worked, too.
 

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