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CP violation: why not in K*, B* vector mesons?

  1. Oct 1, 2008 #1
    Experimentalists have measured CP violation in neutral K and B mesons.
    Everybody is unhappy that so far there are only 2 systems so
    for which these measurements are possible.
    (Neutral D mesons are predicted to show such a small effect that it
    is probably unmeasurable for a long time.)
    All these are spin 0 mesons.

    But why is it not possible to test CP violation also in spin 1 mesons,
    such as K* and B*? Is there a fundamental reason or is it simply that
    experiments are too difficult?

    François
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 1, 2008 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    The K* decays strongly and the B* decays electromagnetically, and CP violation is a phenomenon that occurs in weak decays.
     
  4. Oct 1, 2008 #3
    Ah, thanks for the clarification. Could it then at least be possible to observe particle-antiparticle mixing, for the neutral K* and B*? Or is that also only visible in weak decays?

    François
     
  5. Oct 1, 2008 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    I'm afraid not.

    Mixing is second-order weak. Neither the K* nor B* last long enough to observe this, by many orders of magnitude.
     
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