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Cracking an egg, why didn't I think of that before?

  1. Mar 16, 2015 #1
    Part of my morning routine involves making "enhanced" oatmeal for my wife and myself. This has been going on for easily two or more years. A single egg is included in the oatmeal along with other ingredients. So for years now every morning I crack open an egg and add it to my mixture without much thought. Only recently I realized by a slight modification of my egg opening technique I can do the job of opening the egg much better. So my question is this, should I find joy in my little discovery or criticize myself for taking so long to come to this technique? This happens all the time, do something the same over and over again and only later to come up with a better way to do something. Normally I criticize myself for taking so long to get it better and don't pat myself on my back.

    What, if any, is the proper amount I should criticize myself for taking so long to figure out stuff?

    Thanks for any advice!

    Video showing my technique,



    Technique of others,



     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 16, 2015 #2
    kinetically speaking i think you would just need to crack it sharply for it to crack along a straight line, aka shearing force.

    Thus along with the motion crack it on top of the edge of a bowl or something sharp so as to create such a force.
     
  4. Mar 16, 2015 #3

    Evo

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    This is a joke, right?
     
  5. Mar 16, 2015 #4
    ^ Hey that's what i was thinking but it's hard for some men to take care of themselves :(
     
  6. Mar 16, 2015 #5
    Sorry, no.
     
  7. Mar 16, 2015 #6

    Evo

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    Oh dear. You know that one of the videos you posted shows the same technique you use, they insert (push in) the thumbs and then separate.

    The best technique is to hit the egg sharply against the edge of a counter and then pull the halves apart. it's worked for me for half a century. :smile:
     
  8. Mar 16, 2015 #7
    Best part about that technique is you can learn to do it one handed quite easily.
     
  9. Mar 16, 2015 #8
    There is an inner membrane that is pretty tough and does not rupture with the initial crack, at least with the eggs our chickens lay.
     
  10. Mar 16, 2015 #9

    Evo

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    Yes, for those that are coordinated! I am not, I am doomed to be a two-hander.
     
  11. Mar 16, 2015 #10

    Evo

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    So you would use the example in the video you posted showing two thumbs to pull the egg apart, that prevents unnecessary breakage.

    Anyway, good examples for people that don't know how to crack a raw egg.
     
  12. Mar 16, 2015 #11
    Your technique is what I think I have done in the past and may not work best with my fat fingers?
     
  13. Mar 16, 2015 #12
    The first video I made this night. I squeeze with one hand and pry open with the thumb and fingers of the other hand.
     
  14. Mar 16, 2015 #13
    What would my other hand do?
     
  15. Mar 16, 2015 #14
    Use your imagination? :p

    When I used to do it I would be mixing the ingredients I put the egg/s into. But I guess it would always depend on what it was I was cooking/baking.
     
  16. Mar 16, 2015 #15
    I don't understand what your breakthrough idea was. You need to do a video showing the 'wrong' way you were doing it.
     
  17. Mar 16, 2015 #16
    The technique Evo uses I think. Video of the old and new technique below.

     
  18. Mar 17, 2015 #17

    Borek

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    I see what you mean - squeezing the egg adds forces that help deform the shell and forces sides of the crack apart. I have not tried it yet but I feel like it should ease growing of the crack in the wanted direction and produce crack that is much cleaner and easier to control. It calls for drawing a diagram of acting forces, simple physics at work.

    No idea if it is worth the effort though.
     
  19. Mar 17, 2015 #18
    I think the squeezing compresses the fluid in the egg membrane and puts the membrane under greater tension which allows the thumb to more easily rupture it? It just "felt" right when I did it.

    Three eggs in this mornings batch of oatmeal instead of one. Scrambled eggs for dinner.
     
  20. Mar 17, 2015 #19

    Doug Huffman

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    No military cooks here? I remember being taught to open four eggs simultaneously, two in each hand, in order to maintain an adequate rate.
     
  21. Mar 17, 2015 #20

    Borek

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    I think it is more about tensions in the shell, please remember there is an air bubble inside of the egg and it makes the content easily compressible. Empty shell would behave similarly.
     
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