Crane Arm Model using beam theory

In summary, for a crane arm on ships, a Bernoulli or Timoshenko model can be used as a first approximation. However, the points of attachment and dynamic effects of moving loads must also be considered for a more accurate design. In marine applications, the design must also take into account previous successes and failures, and the hydraulics and control system must be designed to protect the crane from exceeding design limits.
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Can a Bernoulli or Timoshenko model be reasonable for a crane arm, on ships?
Can a Bernoulli or Timoshenko model be reasonable for a crane arm, on ships?

Yes, the arm might have a truss element, yes there is a hydraulic force to lift the arm (or cables).

But to some extent, can one model the crane arm as one of a simple beam (either Timoshenko or Bernoulli -- and, which one of those, if them)?

And, yes, there are dynamic effects of moving loads, etc. But for a simple model, would either of those two theories work?
 

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Trying2Learn said:
Can a Bernoulli or Timoshenko model be reasonable for a crane arm, on ships?
Yes, but only as a first approximation.
In the second approximation, the points of attachment become critical to the design.

Marine applications will be engineered based on a long experience of previous successes, with only a few minor failures. Good design requires the hydraulics and control system be designed to protect the crane from exceeding design limits while operating or stowed.
 

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