D & L Glucose: Haworth Formula Explained

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In summary, the link provided discusses the Haworth formula for D glucose and how it can also represent L glucose due to the rotation around the C4-C5 bond. This rotation does not change the stereochemistry of the molecule. The link also discusses the D/L convention and the author's opinion on it.
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It is a rotation around the axis defined by the C4-C5 bond by 60°. Bonds are allowed to rotate, and do so very quickly without changing stereochemistry. Imagine the three substituents on C5 as the legs of a tripod, with the camera or whatnot as the rest of the molecule, and you may be able to see it better.

Refer to this link for an idea about D/L. For what it's worth, I agree with that author about the whole D/L convention. It always annoyed me and I never retained that information beyond whatever exam I needed to know it for.
 

1. What is D & L glucose?

D & L glucose is a type of sugar molecule that is found in many foods and is the primary source of energy for living organisms. It is also known as dextrose and is part of the larger group of carbohydrates.

2. What is the Haworth formula for D & L glucose?

The Haworth formula is a way of representing the chemical structure of D & L glucose in a simplified form. It shows the five carbon atoms in the molecule arranged in a ring, with the oxygen atom attached to the first and fifth carbon atoms.

3. How is the Haworth formula different from other structural formulas?

The Haworth formula is different from other structural formulas because it is a two-dimensional representation of the molecule, whereas other formulas may be three-dimensional. It also focuses on the ring structure of D & L glucose, rather than showing all of the individual atoms and bonds.

4. What is the significance of the D & L designation in D & L glucose?

The D & L designation refers to the orientation of the hydroxyl group (OH) on the fourth carbon atom in the molecule. D-glucose has the hydroxyl group on the right side, while L-glucose has it on the left side. This designation is important in distinguishing between different forms of glucose and has implications for their biological functions.

5. How is D & L glucose used in scientific research?

D & L glucose is commonly used in scientific research as a source of energy for cells in cultures and experiments. It is also used in biochemical and metabolic studies to understand how glucose is metabolized in the body. Additionally, it is used in the food industry as a sweetener and preservative.

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