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De Broglie wavelength of an atom

  1. Jul 10, 2015 #1
    In my book it is says,
    DeBroglie wavelength of a particle at temp T is, λ = h/√(2mKT) and
    DeBroglie wavelength of He atom is, λ = h/√(3mKT)

    Well, λ = h/ mv and mv2/2 = (3/2) KT and so , λ = h/√(3mKT)
    How to prove the first one..??
    and why they are different...??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 10, 2015 #2
    Try and follow the format for asking HW questions.
     
  4. Jul 10, 2015 #3
    Sorry for that...being new I didn't get it ...
    Here it is..

    The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Prove that , DeBroglie wavelength of a particle at temp T is, λ = h/√(2mKT) and
    DeBroglie wavelength of He atom is, λ = h/√(3mKT)
    h = planck's constant ; K = boltzmann constant


    Relevant equations

    λ = h/p ,
    p = mv ,
    mv2/2 = 3/2 KT


    The attempt at a solution

    For helium atom we take
    mv2/2 = 3/2 KT
    so, v = √ (3KT/m)
    ∴ λ = h/√(3mKT) ...........(proved)

    My question is for the deBroglie wavelength of a particle should I take
    mv2/2 = 1/2 KT and proceed like before.....??
     
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