Designing & Operating a High Vacuum System

In summary, the conversation is about designing a high vacuum system for a project. The system consists of a chamber, an oil diffusion pump, an ionization gauge, a vent valve, two valves in the connection between the chamber and foreline trap, a foreline trap with a thermocouple gauge, and a rotary pump. The question is about the proper valves to open and close in order to operate the vacuum system. The suggestion is made to post the question in a general engineering forum for more help.
  • #1
jumbogala
423
4

Homework Statement


I'm doing a project where I have to design a high vacuum system (just on paper).

I think I've figured out how all the parts hook up together, but I'm not sure how to operate the vacuum.


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


So I have a chamber connected to an oil diffusion pump. The chamber has an ionization gauge in it for measuring the pressure, and it has a vent valve.

Then there are supposed to be two valves in the connection between my chamber and my foreline trap. I don't understand why, can anyone explain?

My foreline trap has a thermocouple gauge in it and it is connected to a rotary pump.

So to make this thing work, what valves need to be open and closed? I think the vent valve needs to be opened to bring the pump to atmospheric pressure, then closed. Then I start up the oil diffusion pump? Or does the rotary pump go first? And when it's reached its lowest pressure, what valves do I open (after turning off the pumps, right?)
 
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  • #2
You might try posting this down in the general engineering forum where design problems are discussed a lot.
 
  • #3
Okay, I will. Thanks!
 

Related to Designing & Operating a High Vacuum System

1. What is a high vacuum system?

A high vacuum system is a device used in scientific experiments or industrial processes to create a low-pressure environment by removing air and other gases from a sealed chamber. This allows for the study or manipulation of materials under conditions of extremely low gas pressure.

2. What are the main components of a high vacuum system?

The main components of a high vacuum system include a vacuum pump, a vacuum chamber, a vacuum gauge, and various valves and fittings. The vacuum pump is responsible for removing gases from the chamber, while the gauge measures the level of vacuum. Valves and fittings are used to control the flow of gas in and out of the chamber.

3. How do you choose the right vacuum pump for your system?

The type of vacuum pump needed for a high vacuum system depends on the desired level of vacuum, the type of gases to be removed, and the volume of the chamber. Common types of vacuum pumps include rotary vane pumps, turbomolecular pumps, and cryogenic pumps. It is important to consider the specific requirements of your system when selecting a vacuum pump.

4. How can you maintain a high vacuum in your system?

To maintain a high vacuum in a system, it is important to regularly check for and repair any leaks in the chamber or the components. The vacuum pump should also be maintained and serviced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Additionally, careful handling and cleaning of the chamber and components can help prevent contamination and maintain a stable vacuum level.

5. What safety precautions should be taken when operating a high vacuum system?

Safety is of utmost importance when working with a high vacuum system. Proper training should be provided to all personnel operating the system. Protective gear, such as gloves and safety glasses, should be worn when handling the chamber or components. It is also important to follow all safety guidelines and protocols provided by the manufacturer. Additionally, regular maintenance and inspection of the system can help prevent accidents or equipment failures.

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