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B Dimensional representation of Roots

  1. Aug 25, 2017 #1
    If the square root as two coordinate axes in the complex plane, does the cubic root has 3 coordinate axes and so on for nth root?

    @vanhees71 Can you please explain this?
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2017 #2

    vanhees71

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    2016 Award

    A complex number has real and imaginary part, which you can intepret as cartesian coordinates of vectors in a plane. I don't understand what you mean by "the square root has 2 coordinates".
     
  4. Aug 25, 2017 #3

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    No. One complex number is simply one complex number. The fact that complex numbers can be written as ##x+iy## with real ##x,y## is due to the fact, that ##\mathbb{C}## is a two-dimensional real vector space and ##\{1,i\}## a basis.
    All complex numbers can be written in this way, no matter how often or which root you take.
     
  5. Aug 25, 2017 #4

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    You are extrapolating with a sample size that is too small. A given complex number has two square roots, three cube roots, four fourth roots, and so on. Each of these roots can be expressed in the form x + iy in Cartesian form (also called rectangular form).

    For example, the complex number -1 + 0i has these cube roots: ##\frac{\sqrt 3} 2 + \frac 1 2 i, -1 + 0i##, and ## \frac{\sqrt 3}2 - i\frac 1 2##. In polar form, these are ##e^{i\pi/3}, e^{i\pi}##, and ##e^{i 5\pi/3}##.
     
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