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A Dirac's Generalized Hamiltonian Dynamics Theory?

  1. Dec 31, 2017 #1

    rocdoc

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    I wondered if anyone might know of any open access materials, possibly lecture notes, on the content of the following papers or books.

    P.A.M Dirac, 1950, Can. J. Math. 2,147 "Generalized Hamiltonian Dynamics"

    P.A.M Dirac, 1933, Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc., 29, 389 "Homogenous variables in classical dynamics"

    S. Shanmugadhasan, 1963, Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc., 59, 743.

    H.P.Kunzle, 1969, Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, 40,107.

    W. Kundt, 1965, Springer Tracts in Modern Physics, 40,107.

    A.Mercier, 1963, Canonical Formalism in Classical Mechanics, New York, Dover.

    P.A.M. Dirac, 1964, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics, Academic Press, London.


    I have access to the first article mentioned above but would still like lecture notes, problem sets with answers on it's content.

    Does anyone have any comments on the importance of Dirac's theory?

    I Googled "dirac generalized hamiltonian" and noted the following were mentioned in the searches returned content.

    nambu

    never regular

    interconnected physical systems, port-hamiltonian

    hamiltonian structures

    Dirac solitons

    Dirac operators

    recursive properties of Dirac brakets

    Dirac geometry

    pontryagin



    Does anyone have any comments on the importance of "these"?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 31, 2017 #2

    Dr Transport

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    I'd bet that if you googled any of those papers or subjects you'd find what you are looking for online and free....
     
  4. Jan 2, 2018 #3

    rocdoc

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    WOW.
    It looks as if the following
    P.A.M Dirac, 1950, Can. J. Math. 2,147 "Generalized Hamiltonian Dynamics"
    is one of the most important papers in the history of physics!
     
  5. Jan 2, 2018 #4

    rocdoc

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    It looks as if the paper is very important for "Classical Field Theory", "Quantum Field Theory", "Gauge Field Theory".

    I did not know.

    My origins in science are in chemistry. I was studying the Hamiltonian for the interaction of light with a molecule, when a reference to Dirac's work turned up. See the references mentioned in Chapter 5 of Loudon ( Reference 1 ).

    Reference
    1. R. Loudon, The quantum theory of light, 2nd Ed, Oxford University Press,1983.
     
  6. Jan 3, 2018 #5

    vanhees71

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    It's not allowed to post links to illegal sources, although for this specific paper I consider it an act of self-defence since I've never been able to download this paper in a legal way from any institution I've ever visited around the world. I don't know, who has a subscription to the Can. J. Math ;-)).

    There's a very good treatment of Dirac brackets and all that in

    Weinberg, QT of Fields, vol. 1

    and also

    Weinberg, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics
     
  7. Jan 3, 2018 #6

    rocdoc

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    Hi vanhees71. Any comment on the importance of Dirac brackets and all that?
     
  8. Jan 3, 2018 #7

    vanhees71

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    It's important to understand the canonical quantization of gauge theories, including Abelian gauge theory (e.g., QED) in general gauges (particularly manifestly covariant ones like the Lorenz gauge). The non-Abelian case is pretty complicated in any gauge, and the path-integral formalism is much more intuitive in that case, although one understands a lot of the complicated aspects when also looking at the operator formalism. The seminal papers are by Kugo et al:

    http://inspirehep.net/search?ln=en&...lls Field Theories&of=hb&sf=earliestdate&so=d
     
  9. Jan 11, 2018 #8

    rocdoc

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  10. Jan 11, 2018 #9

    dextercioby

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    Amazing, thank you for your work :)
     
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