Do any physicists switch to cooking?

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Pengwuino
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Man am i tempted to start cooking now! but no no, ill stay a physics major... The one thing i really hate about cooking for some reason is that it takes so much more time to make food then it takes to actually sit down and eat it. Like ive told 3 people, "30 minutes to make, 3 minutes to eat, utter inefficiency" even though theres nothing 'inefficient' about it!

I want to make some chimichangas but i dont think we have any of hte ingredients. I'd make the greatest food though, id bust out my scales and timers and do everything to the gram and to the second and to the ml.
 

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  • #2
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Well, ZapperZ sort of became a baker on the side at graduate school I believe. He discovered he liked to make bread as a good stress-reliever. Does that count?
 
  • #3
Moonbear
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z-component said:
Well, ZapperZ sort of became a baker on the side at graduate school I believe. He discovered he liked to make bread as a good stress-reliever. Does that count?
I bake for the same reason. There's no reason not to learn to cook along with whatever else you do. Of course, if you're going to wolf down your meals in 3 minutes without even tasting the food, there's not much point in learning to cook well. :biggrin: The idea of good food is you take your time enjoying it and savoring all the flavors. :approve:
 
  • #4
Evo
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This is a great website for engineers that cook. :wink: "Have an analytical mind? Like to cook? This is the site to read!"

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/

Maybe there is a "cooking for physicists" site?
 
  • #5
Pengwuino
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hahaha theres 'bacon cooking tests'

hilarious
 
  • #6
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Could someone explain the term "cook" to me?
 
  • #7
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zoobyshoe said:
Could someone explain the term "cook" to me?
The verb or noun?
 
  • #8
Pengwuino
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zoobyshoe said:
Could someone explain the term "cook" to me?
It's what women do in their spare time. It involves various rituals and prayers where small children are normally sacrificed. Sometimes it is done on a mountain to appease the Food Network Gods.
 
  • #9
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Pengwuino said:
It's what women do in their spare time. It involves various rituals and prayers where small children are normally sacrificed. Sometimes it is done on a mountain to appease the Food Network Gods.
No way! We don't sacrifice small children, only penguins. :devil: Tastes like chicken.
 
  • #10
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  • #11
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dduardo said:
OMG! The charts and pictures, they're beautiful! Cooking Makes Sense! :surprised
*Runs to kitchen*
Hmm...I wonder if it will work for Enigma too. :rolleyes: Nah, he's a lost cause in the kitchen. :rofl:
 
  • #12
Pengwuino
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Wheres all the charts and pictures?!??! TELL ME!!!!
 
  • #13
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He actually references "cooking for physicists"!!!!

Equipment & Gear: Common Materials of Cookware

Over the last year, I've received several requests to write an article on cookware. This is a huge subject, and I've been struggling to figure out a way to present the information accurately and concisely. I decided to divide the information up into separate articles and focus this one on some common materials used in the construction of cookware. I also had to decide how much science and math to include. After some thought on the subject, since this site is called "Cooking For Engineers" and not "Cooking for Physicists", I've decided to include enough information that my readers will grasp the concepts without actually doing any derivations (perhaps this could be a future article).

Cool page http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article_2004.php?id=120
 
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Evo said:
I've decided to include enough information that my readers will grasp the concepts without actually doing any derivations (perhaps this could be a future article).
:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

GO PHYSICS!
 
  • #15
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Last edited:
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  • #17
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Moonbear said:
Uh oh...I guess they forgot their calculator. :rofl:
typical engineers :rolleyes:
 
  • #18
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  • #19
Pengwuino
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So what do you suggest all mighty Evo, 4 or 8 cups!
 
  • #20
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4 cups milk, 4 cups bourbon

except the bourbon doesn't go into the eggnog, if you know what I mean :tongue2:
 
  • #21
dduardo
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I'm going to break out my chemistry set and use a pipette to get accurate volumes of fluid. This way I can create a similar test all the time.
 
  • #22
Pengwuino
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dduardo said:
I'm going to break out my chemistry set and use a pipette to get accurate volumes of fluid. This way I can create a similar test all the time.
haha yah thats what i always say, if i hada lab/kitchen, id be set
 
  • #23
dduardo
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Professional cooks tend to do everything by eye. As an engineer I want reproducible results. If it means using various chemistry equipment to find the perfect ratios so be it.

Test 1: 500ml of milk => Too Dry
Test 2: 520ml of milk => Too Watery
Test 3: 510ml of milk => Just right
 
  • #24
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dduardo said:
Professional cooks tend to do everything by eye. As an engineer I want reproducible results. If it means using various chemistry equipment to find the perfect ratios so be it.

Test 1: 500ml of milk => Too Dry
Test 2: 520ml of milk => Too Watery
Test 3: 510ml of milk => Just right
:rofl: :rofl:
 
  • #25
Pengwuino
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dduardo said:
Professional cooks tend to do everything by eye. As an engineer I want reproducible results. If it means using various chemistry equipment to find the perfect ratios so be it.
Really? I was told professional chefs have setups that practically resembles laboratories when they 'design' dishes.
 

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