Do entangled particles always react in an anti-symmetric way?

In summary: The particles may be in an entangled state, but that does not mean that they are "linked" in any way. What counts as "linkage" in quantum mechanics is a very contentious issue.
  • #1
Jerome71
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do (intrinsically) entangled particles always react in the opposite way?
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  • #2
Part of the design of my logo is to overlapping elements. If one goes white, the other goes black, if one turns round, the turns into a square. Because my assumption is that something in quantum works anti-symetric to each other. Is my assumption right?
 
  • #4
Jerome71 said:
once particles are (intrinsically) entangled do they always react in the opposite way/ anti-symetric to each other?
It depends on the kind of particle and the specific entangled state they are in.
 
  • #5
Peter, thank you so much for your reply!

I have made a video:

trying to explain the logo we created for our Quantum client. In point 1 I make this statement which is not correct.

Do you have an idea what to say here about their relationship othter then "Remotely entangled particles that are intrinsically linked with and interact to each other." I hope something that could say somethting like "the opposite/ anti-symetric" with maybe the word "in most/ some cases"). But is that correct?

Thnx again for your time.
 
  • #6
Jerome71 said:
Do you have an idea what to say here about their relationship othter then "Remotely entangled particles that are intrinsically linked with and interact to each other."
Even that's not strictly correct. The only strictly correct thing you can say about entangled particles, at the level of detail you are using, is that they are entangled. Pretty much anything else you come up with in words will be wrong. The really correct way to describe the actual physics is with math, not words.
 
  • #7
Jerome71 said:
Do you have an idea what to say here about their relationship othter then "Remotely entangled particles that are intrinsically linked with and interact to each other." I hope something that could say somethting like "the opposite/ anti-symetric" with maybe the word "in most/ some cases"). But is that correct?
As PeterDonis rightly says, most words about entangled particles fall flat. A few comments can be added. Assuming that the the entangled system of 2 particles has the anti-symmetric type of entanglement:

1. It is not true that the particles always react in opposite ways. You can do all kinds of things to one, and the other will not show ANY connection.

2. There are some other situations in which it *appears* that doing something to one causes a related (but oppositied) action on the other. However, this is something of an illusion, and is subject to being interpreted many different ways. Those interpretations are in fact called "quantum interpretations" and there is a subforum here devoted to discussing that subject.
 

1. What is entanglement and how does it work?

Entanglement is a phenomenon in quantum mechanics where two or more particles become connected in such a way that the state of one particle is dependent on the state of the others, even when they are physically separated. This connection is known as quantum entanglement and it occurs through a process called quantum superposition.

2. Can entangled particles be separated?

Yes, entangled particles can be separated and moved to different locations. However, their entangled state will remain intact, meaning that any changes to one particle will still affect the others, even if they are separated by large distances.

3. How do scientists create entangled particles?

Entangled particles can be created through various methods, such as using a beam splitter to split a photon into two entangled photons, or using a quantum computer to entangle particles through controlled interactions. However, the exact method depends on the type of particles being used and the desired level of entanglement.

4. Do entangled particles always react in an anti-symmetric way?

No, entangled particles do not always react in an anti-symmetric way. While entangled particles do exhibit correlated behavior, the exact nature of their reactions can vary depending on the type of entanglement and the specific measurements being made on the particles.

5. What are the potential applications of entangled particles?

Entangled particles have potential applications in various fields, such as quantum computing, secure communication, and precision measurements. They can also be used to study fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics and potentially lead to new technologies and discoveries.

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