Do professors hate writing multiple LoRs?

In summary, when applying to universities, it is recommended to apply to multiple reach schools as they are highly competitive. This may require sending multiple Letters of Recommendations (LoRs) from different teachers. However, it is common for teachers to simply reprint or upload previous LoRs if needed. This may be easier with a closer relationship with the teacher.
  • #1
16
0
I'm not exactly in college yet but will be soon. Looking at several threads, reus are extremely competitive, especially for freshmen. Many say to apply to ten or fifteen of them. But is it typical to send that many LoRs for one student?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Here's a secret: those of us who have written Letters of Recommendations before, we simply just print out more if you need more. Or in these modern times, we just upload as many times as needed.

Zz.
 
  • #3
Yeah whenever I've needed LORs from one teacher, I just told him to use the old ones again lol! But we're pretty close so it's cool, I don't how well that would work in a more formal relationship.
 
  • #4
Haha thanks for the reassurances, I would have had a panic attack plotting on how to ask them for multiples!
 
  • #5


I can understand the concern and confusion surrounding the number of Letters of Recommendation (LoRs) required for college applications. While it is true that the college admissions process can be competitive, it is not necessarily true that professors hate writing multiple LoRs.

In fact, many professors are more than willing to write LoRs for their students, as it is a way for them to support and advocate for their academic abilities and potential. However, it is important to keep in mind that professors are busy individuals with their own research and teaching responsibilities, so it is important to approach them respectfully and give them ample time to write the LoR.

Additionally, it is not necessary to send a large number of LoRs for one student. Quality over quantity is key when it comes to LoRs. It is better to have a few strong and personalized LoRs from professors who know the student well, rather than a large number of generic LoRs from professors who may not have a strong connection with the student.

Ultimately, it is important for students to carefully consider the number and quality of their LoRs when applying to colleges. It is also a good idea for students to establish strong relationships with their professors throughout their academic career, as this can make the process of requesting LoRs much easier and more effective.
 

1. Why do professors hate writing multiple LoRs?

Professors may not necessarily hate writing multiple Letters of Recommendation (LoRs), but it can be a time-consuming and demanding task. They have to take the time to carefully craft each letter, highlighting the student's strengths and accomplishments, and provide specific examples to support their claims. Additionally, professors may receive numerous requests for LoRs, making it overwhelming to keep up with them all.

2. Is it appropriate to ask the same professor for multiple LoRs?

It is generally not recommended to ask the same professor for multiple LoRs unless there is a significant change in your academic or professional career. This is because the professor may have already highlighted all your strengths and accomplishments in the first letter, and writing multiple letters may become repetitive and less impactful.

3. How can I make the process of requesting multiple LoRs easier for my professor?

To make the process easier for your professor, you can provide them with all the necessary information and materials they need to write a strong LoR. This includes your resume, a brief summary of your academic and career goals, specific examples of your accomplishments, and any relevant application materials. You can also give them ample time to write the letter and appreciate their efforts by sending a thank-you note after the process is complete.

4. Can I request a LoR from a professor I had a long time ago?

It is generally recommended to request LoRs from professors who know you well and can speak to your recent academic and professional achievements. If you had a professor a long time ago, they may not have a current understanding of your abilities and may not be the best person to write a strong LoR. However, if you have maintained a good relationship with them and have kept in touch, they may still be able to provide valuable insights in your letter.

5. How important are LoRs in the application process?

LoRs are an essential part of the application process for many academic and professional opportunities. They provide a third-party perspective on your abilities, work ethic, and potential for future success. Admissions committees and employers often rely on LoRs to gain a better understanding of the applicant and to make informed decisions. Therefore, it is crucial to choose recommenders who can provide strong and positive letters to support your application.

Suggested for: Do professors hate writing multiple LoRs?

Replies
9
Views
898
Replies
4
Views
720
Replies
1
Views
901
Replies
87
Views
12K
Replies
10
Views
1K
Replies
22
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
926
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top