Do you know a good site to find jobs as teacher for high schools/colleges?

In summary: The Chronicle of Higher Education has a website that has a searchable database of teaching jobs in your state.In summary, to become a certified high school teacher in the USA, you will need to go through a certification/licensure program. There are also part-time or adjunct positions that do not require certification, but usually require graduate-level coursework. Requirements vary state by state, but my state does not require a state teaching license. If you want to become a teacher in the USA, you should consider post-secondary education opportunities.
  • #1
Oxygenne
51
0
I am interested to teaching high schools or colleges (USA), but not in a university, if you know one please advice.
 
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  • #2
For college positions, try the Chronicle of Higher Education available on line.
 
  • #3
Google for "(your state) teaching jobs". It seems that many have state-wide teaching job boards.

Are you already a certified high school teacher? If not, you will need to go through a certification/licensure program to teach at any public school (and many private schools).
 
  • #4
no, I am not with license , I did nit know I need that
Thank you!
 
  • #5
Also note that in the USA, "colleges" and "universities" both grant bachelor's degrees, and they both normally require a Ph.D. for a tenure-track position.

There are also short-term or part-time "adjunct" or "instructor" positions that don't require a Ph.D. but do usually require some graduate-level coursework. At my college, for example, in order to teach here at all, you must have taken at least 18 semester-hours (credits) of graduate-level coursework in your field.
 
  • #6
Thank you, I have PhD even a postdoc.
 
  • #7
The US also has community colleges, generally two-year institutions that offer associate's degrees (and often many professional and trade certification).

Requirements vary state by state for the community colleges, but my state and those around me do not require a state teaching license.
 
  • #8
I don't want to discourage you from your job search, but I would like to bring an important issue to your awareness so that you can plan accordingly.

Based on what I saw posted in this thread, you have a Ph.D., yet no teaching certification. Therefore, you probably have little teaching experience. When it comes time for the school district to hire potential job candidates (assuming you had certification), they may be much more likely to choose someone fresh out of college rather than you. Why? The reason is money. With your advanced education, you will automatically start out higher on the salary scale. So, you will have to really distinguish yourself from other candidates to have any opportunity.

I used to be a teacher in PA. In my school district, I saw excellent teachers, whom had numerous accolades and experience in leadership roles, that tried to find jobs in better school districts get rejected. The reason was money; they already had 5-15 years experience, depending on the particular case, and the school district chose to hire college graduates with no experience (half of which according to statistics will leave the field within 5 years) instead for each case. This effect may only be local but I doubt it, since many organizations these days, including school districts, are tight with their money.

Based on your background, I would say that your better suited for post-secondary education job opportunities.
 
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Related to Do you know a good site to find jobs as teacher for high schools/colleges?

1. What are some good websites to find job listings for teachers in high schools and colleges?

Some popular websites for finding teaching jobs in high schools and colleges include Indeed, Monster, HigherEdJobs, and Teach Away.

2. Are there any specific websites that specialize in job postings for teachers in certain subjects or grade levels?

Yes, there are websites that cater specifically to teachers in certain subjects or grade levels. For example, Teachers-Teachers.com focuses on K-12 education, while The Chronicle of Higher Education is geared towards college and university teaching positions.

3. How can I ensure that the job listings I find are legitimate and not scams?

One way to ensure the legitimacy of job listings is to research the school or institution posting the job. Look for their website or contact information to verify that they are a real organization. You can also check reviews from past employees or reach out to current employees for their experiences. Additionally, be cautious of any job postings that require you to pay a fee or provide personal information.

4. Are there any online resources specifically for teachers looking for remote or online teaching positions?

Yes, there are several websites that specialize in remote or online teaching positions, such as FlexJobs, Virtual Vocations, and Online Teaching Jobs. These websites allow you to filter your search for remote or online positions.

5. Can I use social media to find teaching job opportunities?

Yes, social media can be a useful tool for finding teaching job opportunities. Many schools and institutions share job postings on their social media pages, so make sure to follow and engage with those accounts. You can also join teacher-specific groups or networks on platforms like LinkedIn and Facebook, where job postings are often shared and discussed.

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