Does dark matter travel faster than light?

In summary, the conversation revolved around the nature of dark matter and its properties that make it elusive and difficult to understand. The theory proposed is that dark matter has a mass half that of a photon and travels faster than light, explaining why it does not interact with light. However, this theory is met with skepticism and the conversation ends with a request for more scientific discussion and debate on the topic.
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DrK
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TL;DR Summary
Dark matter, the elusive mass that makes up most of the universe, doesn’t interact with light. Is this because it travels faster than light itself?
Summary: Dark matter, the elusive mass that makes up most of the universe, doesn’t interact with light. Is this because it travels faster than light itself?

I have been working on the maths and the theory for several months now in order to discover the nature of dark matter. By rearranging and solving the Friedmann equations I have found the mass of dark matter to be half the energy equivalent of a single photon - therefore dark matter has half the mass of a photon. Now, imagine dark matter has the same energy as a photon - it can therefore travel faster than the speed of light. As we know, traveling at or near the speed of light, mass increases. Due to traveling faster than light, dark matter has a higher than usual mass in relation to its resting mass, thus accounting for the large 'missing' mass around galaxies.
This is the reason why light cannot interact with dark matter, it is essentially too fast for light to interact with it. Even when something is dark, when hit by light, baryonic matter will become luminous. Dark matter is therefore non-baryonic, traveling faster than light and has a mass half that of a photon.

So, how was it created? I theorise that dark matter was created from the energy before the Big Bang and this energy does not dissipate to the surroundings, allowing it to travel faster than light indefinitely. Although my theory does not yet cover this next point, I believe it is worth a mention: Dark matter can also be created and released from black holes. Inside black holes we could have the right conditions to create dark matter and due to dark matter traveling faster than light can escape the gravity of a black hole, this is known as Hawking radiation.
 
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Dark matter interacts by gravitation, so it has nonzero mass. Therefore it can't travel at, and nothing does travel faster than the speed of light.

As we don't know what it is made of, we can only speculate. But we neither speculate here nor do we discuss personal theories. The probability that they are wrong is really very close to one.
 
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I appreciate that you do not comment on theories on here, but science is about sharing ideas and that’s all I am trying to do so please keep commenting.

Dark matter is not normal matter therefore we need to think outside ‘normal’ laws to understand it. Whilst I 100% agree with your comment in terms of ‘normal’ matter, let’s just take the rest mass of a neutrino which is non-zero and these travel at or very close to the speed of light (and only interact via gravity and the weak force). My calculations for the mass of dark matter put its mass at 1000th of that of a neutrino, and as stated above, half the mass equivalent of light itself. If dark matter has a mass half the ‘mass’ of light but has, for example, the same energy, then it must travel faster than light. General relativity does not exclude the possibility of faster-than-light travel and this could be where quantum physics meets classical physics. If dark matter traveled slower than light then we could shine light on it and see it, but we cannot.

Please, as I say, keep commenting and pick holes in my theory. I would rather know I was wrong through good scientific discussion and debate than because someone just said I was wrong.
 
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  • #4
DrK said:
I appreciate that you do not comment on theories on here, but science is about sharing ideas and that’s all I am trying to do so please keep commenting.
You implicitly used the quantifier 'any', which makes it wrong.
Dark matter is not normal matter...
This is unknown and probably wrong, depending on your undefined 'normal'.
... therefore we need to think outside ‘normal’ laws to understand it.
To discuss outside the box you will first have to learn what is in the box.
Whilst I 100% agree with your comment in terms of ‘normal’ matter, let’s just take the rest mass of a neutrino which is non-zero and these travel at or very close to the speed of light (and only interact via gravity and the weak force). My calculations for the mass of dark matter put its mass at 1000th of that of a neutrino, ...
Unlikely.
... and as stated above, half the mass equivalent of light itself. If dark matter has a mass half the ‘mass’ of light...
Light has no mass, it has energy.
... but has, for example, the same energy,...
which contradicts what you just have said
... then it must travel faster than light.
Nothing does, so the opposite is true: it has to travel slower than light.
General relativity does not exclude the possibility of faster-than-light travel and this could be where quantum physics meets classical physics. If dark matter traveled slower than light then we could shine light on it and see it, but we cannot.

Please, as I say, keep commenting and pick holes in my theory. I would rather know I was wrong through good scientific discussion and debate than because someone just said I was wrong.
I'm afraid there are too many holes and too few substance, sorry. You cannot just wildly calculate anything without studying physics first, and even then, you probably will have to do more than just a master. The random distribution of modern key words doesn't make your reasoning better.

Thread closed.
 
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