Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Does radioactive decay slow in a particle accelerator

  1. Feb 25, 2015 #1
    I am a non physicist-scientist, but landed here searching the internet for this answer. Has it ever been done? Thank you for any answers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 25, 2015 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

  4. Feb 25, 2015 #3

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    The CERN and Brookhaven muon g-2 experiments have high speed muons in a storage ring. The time dilation factor is around 30.
     
  5. Feb 25, 2015 #4
     
  6. Feb 25, 2015 #5

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    When I was in graduate school 35 years ago, one of my friends worked on an experiment involving beams of sigma and xi hyperons at Fermilab. Without the time dilation of their lifetimes, the hyperons would not have been able to travel from the production target to the detector.
     
  7. Feb 25, 2015 #6
    Thank you for the response. I'm trying to find out if there has been evidence of time slowing or accelerating as particles approach the speed of light. What would be a natural accelerator?
     
  8. Feb 25, 2015 #7
    Thank you. Is this considered evidence of time dilation?
     
  9. Feb 25, 2015 #8

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Absolutely.
     
  10. Feb 25, 2015 #9

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Did you reat the link? It's pretty descriptive, yet succinct.
     
  11. Feb 26, 2015 #10

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Muons produced by cosmic rays demonstrate this effect.
     
  12. Feb 27, 2015 #11

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That hyper physics link that Russ W gave you tells you all about it. It's a 'natural' event.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Does radioactive decay slow in a particle accelerator
  1. Radioactive decay (Replies: 1)

Loading...