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Does the Dri Buddi Really Dry Clothes and Iron them Out?

  1. Feb 3, 2013 #1
    There is this new product on the market called the Dri Buddi Clothes Dryer that claims to use less electricity than a regular tumble dryer, flattens out the clothes with jets of hot air coming from its blower, does not damage or shrink clothing, does not have filters that need cleaning, is lighter, more portable and takes up less space.

    The question is, does this really work? The links to the product can be found below as a source of information:

    http://www.jmldirect.com/uk/laundry/dri-buddi/invt/d04db10100000001/

    http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/8501147.htm#pdpFullProductInformation

    Now, in this product review, a customer claims that towels are nearly impossible to dry with this device. Is this true? The review can be found below:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2013 #2

    Evo

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    Sounds like a hair dryer for clothes. I can understand it not being able to dry thick items like towels. I don't think clothes will be any less wrinkled than if you remove clothes from the dryer as soon as it stops. Clothes like linen and natural cotton will not come out looking ironed.
     
  4. Feb 3, 2013 #3
    So can other types of fabric be flattened by this device?

    What about this other technology that I have heard about called a solid-state dryer. It is basically a dryer with no moving parts and it uses only the direct application of heat to dry fabrics. It is basically like an electric oven for clothes. I saw it in an appliance center but I was not able to get the brand but I hope my description alone can help you to tell whether this device will work or not.
     
  5. Feb 3, 2013 #4

    lisab

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    My computer is doing odd things tonight so I can't watch the video - but where does the thing vent to? Just to the room? That could encourage mold growth.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2013 #5

    Evo

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    The reason clothes dryers tumble is to keep the air flowing around them to be more effective, and prevent wrinkling.
     
  7. Feb 4, 2013 #6

    Garth

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    We have two Dri Buddies...

    They work really well, not quite as quick as a tumble dryer but much cheaper to buy and run.

    As Evo said, a hair dryer for clothes.

    You hang the clothes up inside them on hangers so there is plenty of space for the hot air to circulate around them.

    I hope this helps,
    Garth
     
  8. Feb 4, 2013 #7

    lisab

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    Does it vent to the room?
     
  9. Feb 4, 2013 #8
    I am sorry but I do not know because the video and the company site does not explain this but I will try to gather more details on the product.
     
  10. Feb 5, 2013 #9

    Garth

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    Yes it does!

    It would need a (slightly) ventilated room. I said slightly because there is not that much condensation from it, it is more gentle than a tumble dryer; as it is on the clothes themselves.

    http://media.daxon.co.uk/images/0/81/AG/0X_99966_3091_1.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  11. Feb 5, 2013 #10
    Actually, I was only thinking of using the solid-state dryer for drying the towels. I was planning on buying a miniature version about half the size of a conventional tumble dryer while the clothes would be dried on the Dri Buddi.

    By the way, what about my other question: can clothes that are not made of linen or natural cotton be ironed out by the Dri Buddi according to the description of the product?
     
  12. Feb 5, 2013 #11

    Evo

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    Not ironed, but permanent-pressed clothing doesn't need ironing, no matter what source of drying you use, as long as you don't go crazy and bunch them up as they're drying, so the result is due to how the material is made, not the dryer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permanent_press
     
  13. Feb 7, 2013 #12
    Thank you for this information, my question has been answered.
     
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