Doubts in Calculating Nuclear Reactions

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I am not talking about the reactions of simple atoms in chemistry, I am speaking, for example deuterium, heavy water, isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, etc.I would like to know how to calculate when two atoms merge, to know mathematically what atom will form, example deuterium + deuterium = helium
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Can someone explain me the calculations? I'm new to the forum, please!
 

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  • #4
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:nb)o0):mad::eek:o_OCalculation of the reaction temperature of two atomic nuclei........................??????I Now that I understand the calculation of the nuclear reaction, I want to understand the calculation of the temperature of each isotope !! understood ??do not see the need to create another topic if I have already created this one! I have a high school diploma, I have finished, I'm still not doing university! I'm talking about the temperature of each individual isotope, and not the temperature of the reaction, does that make sense to you? about the nuclear reaction, which was the topic of my first topic the friend Berkemam helped me, now the problem is this temperature !! I do not know if my question is relevant or not, but thanks to whoever is interested in answering my question!
 

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  • #5
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Isotopes don't have temperatures.
Temperature is a property of a large collection of particles in a system. You can talk about the temperature of a gas of hydrogen, for example. You can also talk about the temperature of a large group of nuclei of some isotope - but then the temperature depends on how this group is prepared, and it is a property of the group only, not a property of the individual nuclei.
 
  • #6
Isotopes don't have temperatures.
Temperature is a property of a large collection of particles in a system. You can talk about the temperature of a gas of hydrogen, for example. You can also talk about the temperature of a large group of nuclei of some isotope - but then the temperature depends on how this group is prepared, and it is a property of the group only, not a property of the individual nuclei.
so it is a property of the individual nuclei, but I searched the internet talking about the coumlob barrier of each atom, if I am wrong correct me please, or it would be the barrier that each nucleus has, and the maximum temperature that is needed to happen the merger is confusing !! I am almost understanding this subject, I have much to learn because electronic study and not physical, but I find physics very interesting !!:nb)o:)?:):mad:o_O:biggrin:
 
  • #7
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The Coulomb barrier is a property of a pair of nuclei. That is not a temperature. It is the electric potential energy the nuclei have just before "touching" (before the strong interaction pulls them together). While you can give the nuclei that much energy in an accelerator for example that is not done in fusion reactors. It is sufficient to get them close, they can tunnel through the remaining potential barrier. The Gamow factor can tell you how likely a reaction is.
 

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