Dust filled universe, is there a type of tension defined?

In summary, there is a quantity in the universe that acts like tension, similar to dark energy, but its strength is not related to mass density.
  • #1
Spinnor
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Say we have dust filled universe. At some instant of time this universe has a mass density rho, and it evolves with time according to General Relativity. Is there a quantity in that universe that acts like tension? Can we associate something like tension in such a universe. Would its strength be related to rho?


Thanks for any help!
 
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  • #2
Spinnor said:
Say we have dust filled universe. At some instant of time this universe has a mass density rho, and it evolves with time according to General Relativity. Is there a quantity in that universe that acts like tension? Can we associate something like tension in such a universe. Would its strength be related to rho?


Thanks for any help!


See for starters:

http://books.google.com/books?id=LA...sure and tension in general relativity&f=true

Free Amazon pages 19,20 of:

Many Worlds in One: The Search for Other Universes by Alex Vilenkin (Hardcover - Jun 27, 2006)
10 new from $6.02
52 used from $1.67
 
  • #3
Spinnor said:
See for starters:

http://books.google.com/books?id=LA...sure and tension in general relativity&f=true

Free Amazon pages 19,20 of:

Many Worlds in One: The Search for Other Universes by Alex Vilenkin (Hardcover - Jun 27, 2006)
10 new from $6.02
52 used from $1.67

This is dark energy/cosmological constant, and its strength is thought to be independent of matter density.
 

Related to Dust filled universe, is there a type of tension defined?

1. What is a dust-filled universe?

A dust-filled universe is a cosmological model in which the majority of matter present in the universe is in the form of dust particles. Dust particles are small, solid particles that are made up of various elements and compounds, such as carbon, silicon, and iron. These particles can be found in interstellar space and can play a significant role in the evolution of galaxies and the formation of stars.

2. How does dust affect the universe?

Dust can have a significant impact on the universe in several ways. For one, dust can absorb and scatter light, making it difficult for astronomers to observe distant objects. Dust can also serve as the building blocks for new stars and planets, as it provides the necessary material for gravitational collapse. Additionally, dust can play a role in regulating the temperature of galaxies and can even affect the chemical composition of the universe.

3. Is there a type of tension defined in a dust-filled universe?

Yes, there is a type of tension defined in a dust-filled universe known as the "dust tension." This tension arises from the dynamics of dust particles in the universe and can affect the expansion rate of the universe. The amount of dust present in the universe can also influence the level of this tension, which can have implications for the overall evolution of the universe.

4. How do scientists study dust in the universe?

Scientists study dust in the universe through various methods, including observing its effects on light and using computer simulations. Astronomers can use telescopes to observe light that has been scattered or absorbed by dust particles, providing insights into the composition and distribution of dust in different regions of the universe. Computer simulations also allow scientists to model the behavior of dust in various scenarios and make predictions about its impact on the universe.

5. Can dust-filled universes exist in other parts of the universe?

Yes, dust-filled universes can exist in other parts of the universe. While our current understanding of the universe suggests that the majority of matter is in the form of dark matter and dark energy, there may be regions where dust is the dominant form of matter. These dust-filled universes may have different characteristics and could offer insights into the evolution of the universe as a whole.

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