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Earthquakes and second one dam prevent earthquake

  1. Mar 25, 2006 #1
    This worls is divided into two groups(not obviously boys and girls:biggrin: ),,first one who believe dams cause earthquakes and second one dam prevent earthquake..
    you are in which one and whats your reasoning..
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 25, 2006 #2
    Dams cause earthquakes? What happened to plate tectonics?
     
  4. Mar 25, 2006 #3

    Moonbear

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    Dams don't have anything at all to do with earthquakes. Where would you get such an idea from?
     
  5. Mar 25, 2006 #4
    Tectonic plates do cause Earthquakes but

    4 Dams have also lead to Earthquakes..
    2 in Russia,1 in Yugoslavia,1 in India(Koena Dam).
     
  6. Mar 25, 2006 #5

    Moonbear

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    Please cite sources that show that.
     
  7. Mar 25, 2006 #6
    Well google Koyna Dam,,you would find enough to believe that how much this place is susceptible..

    the physics of Earthquakes i believe is not much known,,thats why may be there are 2 groups..
    Clearly you are in 2nd group..
     
  8. Mar 25, 2006 #7

    Moonbear

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    No, I'm in neither of your groups. And I'm not going to do the research for you. You're making a claim that there is a connection between dams and earthquakes, so you need to provide the support for it.
     
  9. Mar 25, 2006 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    Actually, it's true. This happened due to the lake in Oroville, Ca, where I lived for a time. The problem is not the dam, rather the problem is the volume of stored water and the resulting mass load on the local plate.

    http://www.johnmartin.com/earthquakes/eqpapers/00000054.htm
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2006
  10. Mar 25, 2006 #9

    Moonbear

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    Okay, with some evidence, I've re-opened the thread. Though, a reservoir is not quite the same as a dam.
     
  11. Mar 25, 2006 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    In the future you need to post reliable sources and references for your claims. I just happened to know about this.
     
  12. Mar 25, 2006 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    :redface: I didn't even realize that you had locked it.
     
  13. Mar 25, 2006 #12
    Moonbear,you are right,,:smile:
    just found an evidence..
    http://www.rediff.com/news/2000/sep/05quake.htm

    Well if you aren't in any then you will become..:biggrin:
     
  14. Mar 25, 2006 #13

    siddharth

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  15. Mar 25, 2006 #14

    Mk

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    At Wikipedia's Konya Dam
     
  16. Mar 25, 2006 #15

    Astronuc

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    The dam certainly doesn't cause an earthquake, but rather the mass (weight) of water accumulating behind a dam may load the local area, and this loading may lead to an earthquake. So indirectly a dam may cause an earthquake.

    Also, the hydraulic pressure may cause water to travel into fissures in the rock which then causes fissures to crack and propagate. The increase in hydaulic (hyrdogeologic) pressure could also contribute to conditions leading to an earthquake. However, the 'earthquakes' are likely to be very low magnitude. The effect of the dam, or rather reservoir will be highly dependent on the local geology, e.g. granite vs basalt vs metamorphic or sedimentary rock.
     
  17. Mar 25, 2006 #16
    Astro,,how is this geology playing a role..

    Actually the dams become more susceptible to earthquake during heavy rain....and yeah absolutely.. , Dams are susceptible to earthquake because they provide storage of water at height,,what else could have been the reason....
     
  18. Mar 25, 2006 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    You seem to be mixing issues here. As stated, dams don't cause earthquakes; it is believed that the load of the stored water behind the dam does. Also, it is thought that sustained, heavy rains may increase the likelihood of quakes by lubricating the intersection of land masses. But this has nothing to do with dams.
     
  19. Mar 27, 2006 #18
    From where do they get energy to intersect?
     
  20. Mar 27, 2006 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    The energy ultimately comes from heat in the planet's interior. Land mass emerges in areas known as divergent rifts, such as the mid-atlantic ridge,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-Atlantic_Ridge

    and the East African Great Rift Valley.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Rift_Valley.

    Land is driven down and lost to the interior in subduction zones, and reclaimed from divergent rifts and volcanism. Again, the system is driven by heat.

    Note also the subduction zone earthquakes, which can produce quakes in excess of mag 9.0, are the most dangerous. Here in the pacific northwest we are overdue for a subduction zone event.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2006
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