Eddy current Losses due to different materials

In summary: I will chose #7 with an edit that I will change to air.As Air will have least eddy currents.In summary, according to the summarizer, air-cored coils are less conductive than wooden-cored coils, and this is because air is a poorer conductor than wood.
  • #1
Physics lover
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25
Homework Statement
Which of the following material would have least Eddy Current losses-:
a)Air cored coil
b)Wooden cored coil
c)Laminated coil
d)Iron coil
Relevant Equations
None
I know only about Laminated,Iron and wooden coil.I don't know what is Air cored coil.
So according to me,it should be Wooden cored coil because less current will flow through wooden cored coil.Ans it will be maximum in Iron cored coil.
Please tell,am I correct or not?I don't know the answer.
 
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  • #2
Have you made any attempt to find out what an air cored coil IS?
 
  • #3
phinds said:
Have you made any attempt to find out what an air cored coil IS?
Yes i searched it on google.But i was not able to understand it.So please help.
 
  • #4
Air core just means non-conducting core. These would include air, plastic, wood, ceramic, etc.
 
  • #5
phinds said:
Air core just means non-conducting core. These would include air, plastic, wood, ceramic, etc.
But wood is already there.But air is the poorest conductor so I think the answer should be air cored.Am I right?
 
  • #6
Physics lover said:
But wood is already there.But air is the poorest conductor so I think the answer should be air cored.Am I right?
Perhaps I should have said non-ferrous. Do you understand how inductors work?
 
  • #7
phinds said:
Perhaps I should have said non-ferrous. Do you understand how inductors work?
Yes an inductor is a device which opposes any current through it.We can also say that it opposes any change in flux passing through it.
If you are saying non ferrous,I will again change my answer to wood.
 
  • #8
Physics lover said:
Yes an inductor is a device which opposes any current through it.We can also say that it opposes any change in flux passing through it.
If you are saying non ferrous,I will again change my answer to wood.
first, do you think air is ferrous?

Second, "opposes any change in flux passing through it" is correct but very incomplete and does not give me any confidence that you understand how inductors work. It sounds like you are just parroting something you read. I think you might be well served to study inductors a bit more.
 
  • #9
phinds said:
Perhaps I should have said non-ferrous. Do you understand how inductors work?
You should have said non magnetic (ferro-,dia- or para-) and non conducting..
 
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  • #10
hutchphd said:
You should have said non magnetic (ferro-,dia- or para-) and non conducting..
yes I agree with you
Sorry phinds that was an incomplete definition but I understand it properly.
And I think you took me wrong.I agreed with the fact that an air cored conductor is made of non ferrous material.That's why I changed my answer to wooden core as non ferrous materials can also be slight condutors.
 
  • #11
Physics lover said:
as non ferrous materials can also be slight condutors.
If non ferrous materials can be slight conductors (and I'm not arguing with that) then why would you think that wood is less conductive than air?
 
  • #12
phinds said:
If non ferrous materials can be slight conductors (and I'm not arguing with that) then why would you think that wood is less conductive than air?
Ok so how will we decide between air cored and wood.Wood is a type of air cored.We cannot say anything,right?
 
  • #13
Physics lover said:
Ok so how will we decide between air cored and wood.Wood is a type of air cored.We cannot say anything,right?
Again, I ask, do you think wood is less conductive than air? Look at it the other way 'round. Is air less conductive than wood?
 
  • #14
phinds said:
Again, I ask, do you think wood is less conductive than air? Look at it the other way 'round. Is air less conductive than wood?
Absolutely not.
 
  • #15
Physics lover said:
Absolutely not.
They both are insulators
 
  • #16
Physics lover said:
Absolutely not.
Absolutely not WHICH? My point is, what causes the least eddy current, something with more conductance or something with less conductance?
 
  • #17
phinds said:
Absolutely not WHICH? My point is, what causes the least eddy current, something with more conductance or something with less conductance?
Eddy current losses are due to more conductance.
 
  • #18
Physics lover said:
They both are insulators
"insulators" are not non-conducting, they are just really bad conductors. Some insulators insulate better than others.
 
  • #19
This is like pulling teeth. So, you think that exactly the same eddy currents will result whether you use wood or air?
 
  • #20
Physics lover said:
Eddy current losses are due to more conductance.
I think that wood is a better conductor than air.
 
  • #21
phinds said:
This is like pulling teeth. So, you think that exactly the same eddy currents will result whether you use wood or air?
I think you took me wrong.I am thinking that wood is a better conductor than air so more eddy currents will develop in it.
 
  • #22
Physics lover said:
I think you took me wrong.I am thinking that wood is a better conductor than air so more eddy currents will develop in it.
So you are going to choose it as creating the least eddy currents, as per your posts #7 and #12.
 
  • #23
phinds said:
So you are going to choose it as creating the least eddy currents, as per your posts #7 and #12.
Sorry for #12.I will chose #7 with an edit that I will change to air.As Air will have least eddy currents.
Am i right?
 
  • #24
Physics lover said:
Sorry for #12.I will chose #7 with an edit that I will change to air.As Air will have least eddy currents.
Am i right?
Don't go back and change previous posts unless you indicate clearly in the post that it has been changed. Otherwise, people reading the thread can get confused.
 
  • #25
phinds said:
Don't go back and change previous posts unless you indicate clearly in the post that it has been changed. Otherwise, people reading the thread can get confused.
I didn't edited my previous post.I am changing my opinion in my mind and not on the post.But now air is my final answer.
 
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1. What are eddy current losses?

Eddy current losses refer to the energy that is dissipated in the form of heat when a magnetic material is subjected to a changing magnetic field. This phenomenon is caused by the resistance of the material to the changing magnetic field, which results in the generation of electric currents within the material.

2. How do different materials affect eddy current losses?

The conductivity and permeability of a material are the main factors that affect eddy current losses. Materials with high conductivity, such as copper, have lower losses compared to materials with low conductivity, such as steel. Similarly, materials with high permeability, such as iron, have higher losses compared to materials with low permeability, such as aluminum.

3. What is the relationship between frequency and eddy current losses?

As the frequency of the magnetic field increases, the eddy current losses also increase. This is because higher frequencies result in faster changes in the magnetic field, which in turn leads to higher induced currents and greater energy dissipation.

4. How can eddy current losses be reduced?

Eddy current losses can be reduced by using materials with lower conductivity and permeability, such as laminated cores made of thin sheets of steel. Another method is to use materials with high resistivity, such as stainless steel, which reduces the flow of eddy currents.

5. What are the practical applications of understanding eddy current losses?

Understanding eddy current losses is important in the design and optimization of electrical equipment, such as transformers, motors, and generators. By minimizing these losses, the efficiency and performance of these devices can be improved, resulting in cost savings and reduced energy consumption.

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