Egypt Shuts Off Internet and Phone Networks as Protests Continue

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It is amazing to read about and watch the pro-democracy protests going on in Egypt right now. *Having been to Cairo and Alexandria just this past November, I recognize a number of the major areas where the protests are taking … http://virtualnavigator.wordpress.com/2011/01/28/egypt-shuts-off-internet-and-phone-networks-as-protests-continue/" [Broken]http://stats.wordpress.com/b.gif?host=virtualnavigator.wordpress.com&blog=11498882&post=496&subd=virtualnavigator&ref=&feed=1

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  • #2
arildno
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The protests are more anti-Mubarak than pro-democracy, Greg..
 
  • #3
mheslep
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Its interesting that in the Iranian election protests a year ago we saw women everywhere in the crowds:

iran.protest.woman.getty.gal.jpg


But in Eygpt lately, none:
protest-in-egypt.jpg
 
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Its interesting that in the Iranian election protests a year ago we saw women everywhere in the crowds:
Bold mine.

Well, I do see one for sure (with a sign in English no less).
 
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  • #5
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Its interesting that in the Iranian election protests a year ago we saw women everywhere in the crowds:
...
If I recall correctly, Mousavi was supported by liberals and educated class. In case of Egypt, it's the poverty class people who seem to be causing the havoc.

I have often read about Iran providing more rights to its women (driving cars). However, I haven't ever read anything in case of Egypt. I believe Egypt is better than Iran in case of women rights.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/483309.stm (1999)
Egyptian women are an increasing presence in the workforce
They can vote; they are significant part of the workforce and there are now two women in the Egyptian cabinet.

But they're not allowed to travel abroad without the permission of their husbands; it's hard for them to initiate divorce; and they can't - like Qassem Amin - become judges.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/5359672.stm (2006)
The number of women graduating from Iran's universities is overtaking the number of men, promising a change in the job market and, with it, profound social change.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7657810.stm (2008)
Iran has announced plans for a new car designed specially for women.
 
  • #6
PhilKravitz
There are vast wealth differences in both Egypt and Iran (and the US). The upper classes have more women's rights the lower classes have less women's rights. Like most things you get the "rights" you have the money and power to hold on to.
 
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PhilKravitz
Funny nobody talks about the wage scales in Egypt. from
http://www.payscale.com/research/EG/Country=Egypt/Salary
I see that on average an accountant makes 17,800 egyptian pounds per year. there are about 6 egyptian pound per dollar so about $3000 per year. Gee that alone sounds like a motivation to revolution.
 
  • #9
Evo
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Funny nobody talks about the wage scales in Egypt. from
http://www.payscale.com/research/EG/Country=Egypt/Salary
I see that on average an accountant makes 17,800 egyptian pounds per year. there are about 6 egyptian pound per dollar so about $3000 per year. Gee that alone sounds like a motivation to revolution.
Do you know how that equates to similar jobs in other countries? Have you heard of "cost of living"?
 
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Evo, Egypt is a large country. How were they able to achieve such an effective control in such a short time?
 
  • #11
PhilKravitz
"A day after international labour day, members of trade unions, public workers and opposition groups gathered to call for an increase in the national minimum wage, set at 35 Egyptian pounds ($6) a month since 1984. They said it should rise to 1,200 pounds ($215)."
from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8657801.stm
even taking into account PPP $6 per month is low.
 
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"A day after international labour day, members of trade unions, public workers and opposition groups gathered to call for an increase in the national minimum wage, set at 35 Egyptian pounds ($6) a month since 1984. They said it should rise to 1,200 pounds ($215)."
from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8657801.stm
even taking into account PPP $6 per month is low.
Was this promoted on the internet or other social media?
 
  • #13
PhilKravitz
Was this promoted on the internet or other social media?
I do not understand. I would guess folks in Egypt that make this kind of money do not have access to the internet due to lack of money. This was the chattering classes in England and the US reading a BBC article on the internet.

Though I do work with Egyptian engineers. The company I work for has a large engineering development organization in Cairo. They make $20,000 per year and taking into account PPP do have access to the internet. They also travel worldwide doing consulting engineering and see the life style lived in the rest of the world. Do they think $6 per month is fair to their fellow countrypersons?
 
  • #14
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I do not understand. I would guess folks in Egypt that make this kind of money do not have access to the internet due to lack of money. This was the chattering classes in England and the US reading a BBC article on the internet.

Though I do work with Egyptian engineers. The company I work for has a large engineering development organization in Cairo. They make $20,000 per year and taking into account PPP do have access to the internet. They also travel worldwide doing consulting engineering and see the life style lived in the rest of the world. Do they think $6 per month is fair to their fellow countrypersons?
You've raised an interesting point. If earnings are very low in Egypt, how many people actually have access to the internet and cell phones?
 
  • #15
arildno
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Evo, Egypt is a large country. How were they able to achieve such an effective control in such a short time?
slate.com has an article on that.

93% of Egypt's outside internet connections are controlled by merely 4 companies.
Nor are there many routers each company controls.
Egyptian law legitimizes that a presidential order to shut down the routers must be followed.

So, 4 phone calls from the government was enough to effect the shutdown.

The stock exchange and similar activity deemed critical has not been shut down:
http://www.slate.com/id/2283000/
 
  • #16
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The stock exchange and similar activity deemed critical has not been shut down:
http://www.slate.com/id/2283000/
I'd like to see a record of the trading activity the past few days - WHO bought and sold WHAT stocks.
 

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