Electric field from a polarized metal sphere?

In summary, the addition of a large metal sphere with no net charge some distance to the left of a positive point charge creates a polarized sphere. It is uncertain whether this polarization will have a force on points a and b, as it depends on the distance and placement of the two objects. If the sphere were replaced with a dipole, the vectors at points a and b would be added together, taking into account the distances from the three charges. The sphere problem is a variation of this situation.
  • #1
txaggiechick
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First, there is a positive point charge sitting in space which creates an electric field around it. Then, a large metal sphere with no net charge is a added some distance to the left of it. Does the addition of this sphere change the magnitude of the electric field at some points a and b which are in between these two objects?


So I know that the large metal sphere will now be polarized but I am not sure if this polarization will have a force on this these spots or if it will cancel out since one side is negative and one side is positive
 
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  • #2
Suppose you replaced your sphere by two point charges, one positive and one negative (a dipole) with the negative charge of the dipole towards the given positive charge. How would you answer the question then? You'd just add up the vectors at your points a and b taking into account the distance of a and b from the three charges. The sphere problem is just a variation on this situation.
 
  • #3


I can provide some insights on this scenario. The addition of the metal sphere will indeed change the electric field at points a and b, as the sphere will create its own electric field due to the redistribution of charges within it. This is known as the "induced electric field."

The magnitude of the induced field will depend on the distance between the point charges and the metal sphere, as well as the polarization of the sphere. The closer the points a and b are to the sphere, the stronger the induced field will be. Additionally, if the sphere is highly polarized, the induced field will be stronger.

However, it is important to note that the total electric field at points a and b will be a combination of the electric fields from the point charge and the induced field from the polarized sphere. This means that the two fields will either add up or cancel out, depending on their direction and magnitude.

In conclusion, the addition of the polarized metal sphere will indeed affect the electric field at points a and b, but the exact magnitude and direction of the change will depend on the specific parameters of the system. Further analysis and calculations would be needed to determine the exact effect on the electric field at these points.
 

Related to Electric field from a polarized metal sphere?

1. What is a polarized metal sphere?

A polarized metal sphere is a metal sphere that has been subjected to an external electric field, causing the atoms within the metal to align in a specific direction.

2. How is an electric field generated from a polarized metal sphere?

When a metal sphere is polarized, the aligned atoms create a separation of positive and negative charges on the surface of the sphere, resulting in an electric field.

3. What factors affect the strength of the electric field from a polarized metal sphere?

The strength of the electric field from a polarized metal sphere depends on the magnitude of the external electric field, the distance from the sphere, and the size and shape of the sphere.

4. How does the direction of the electric field relate to the direction of polarization in a metal sphere?

The direction of the electric field is parallel to the direction of polarization in a metal sphere. This means that the positive and negative charges on the surface of the sphere are aligned in the same direction as the external electric field.

5. Can a polarized metal sphere be used to shield from external electric fields?

Yes, a polarized metal sphere can act as a shield from external electric fields. The aligned charges on the surface of the sphere create an opposite electric field that cancels out the external field within the sphere, providing protection inside the sphere.

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