Electrons near speed of light in space

In summary: Yup, and this is why each new generation of colliders has always been accompanied by a new generation of linear electron accelerators. Prettty much you have <colliders -> highest energy -> new particles>, (linears -> cleanest signals -> new laws>. For example all the upper division quarks were discovered at colliders, but the anomalous scaling that led to asymptotic freedom was discovered at SLAC, a linear accelerator.
  • #1
fcpeace17
4
0
http://www.spacedaily.com/news/stellar-02d.html
how would one go about reproducing these effects, have their been more studies since this study? Basicly it is saying that there is a way for magnetic fields to interact so that there is a "pocket" in which electrons are charged with extremely high energy and can travel at 80@ the speed of light. how can we bring this down to Earth and work with it in the lab? Evan
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Electrons are routinely accelerated to near light speed in particle accelerators here on Earth (LEP for example).
 
  • #3
Just to expand on that, the fact that electrons are light and fundamental makes their collisions extremely clean.

At Fermilab, the collisions are made between protons and antiprotons instead; in that case, the main collision occurs between one quark from each proton/antiproton, but there is a lot more going on around. Lower energy collisions among the rest of the particles that make each particle (other quarks and the gluons inside it) produce a lot more particles and a much more difficult environment from which to extract conclusions about what hapened.
 
  • #4
ahrkron said:
Just to expand on that, the fact that electrons are light and fundamental makes their collisions extremely clean.

At Fermilab, the collisions are made between protons and antiprotons instead; in that case, the main collision occurs between one quark from each proton/antiproton, but there is a lot more going on around. Lower energy collisions among the rest of the particles that make each particle (other quarks and the gluons inside it) produce a lot more particles and a much more difficult environment from which to extract conclusions about what hapened.

Yup, and this is why each new generation of colliders has always been accompanied by a new generation of linear electron accelerators. Prettty much you have <colliders -> highest energy -> new particles>, (linears -> cleanest signals -> new laws>. For example all the upper division quarks were discovered at colliders, but the anomalous scaling that led to asymptotic freedom was discovered at SLAC, a linear accelerator.

There is an international initiative under way now to build a next-generation linear accelerator tocomplement the LHC, the new collider being built at CERN.
 

Related to Electrons near speed of light in space

1. What happens to electrons when they approach the speed of light in space?

As electrons approach the speed of light in space, they gain energy and momentum. This causes their mass to increase and their behavior to become more unpredictable.

2. How fast can electrons travel in space?

Electrons can travel at speeds up to 99.99% of the speed of light in space. However, they can never reach the speed of light, as it is the ultimate speed limit in the universe.

3. How do electrons near the speed of light affect their surroundings?

As electrons near the speed of light, they create a strong magnetic field that can interact with other particles and objects in their surroundings. This can cause disruptions and changes in the environment.

4. Can electrons near the speed of light be observed?

Yes, electrons near the speed of light can be observed using specialized equipment, such as particle accelerators. However, their behavior and properties can only be fully understood through complex mathematical models.

5. What are the potential applications of studying electrons near the speed of light in space?

Studying electrons near the speed of light in space can help us better understand the fundamental laws of physics and the behavior of particles in extreme conditions. This knowledge can also have practical applications in fields such as astrophysics, space travel, and energy production.

Similar threads

Replies
6
Views
569
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
9
Views
824
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
17
Views
749
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
21
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
2
Replies
45
Views
3K
Replies
23
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
38
Views
2K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
13
Views
1K
Back
Top