Energy required to fully ionize Uranium

In summary, the maximum wavelength of light required to fully ionise Uranium to U92+ and strip it of all electrons is determined by calculating the energy needed to remove the last, outermost electron. This takes into consideration direct ionization and neglects non-linear effects.
  • #1
doppeled
6
0
1. What is the maximum wavelength of light required to fully ionised Uranium to U92+, i.e.
strip it of all electrons and leaving a bare nucleus? For simplicity, only consider direct
ionisation and neglect non-linear effects.





Attempt at solution

Ok, so the electron structure of the atom is 2,8,18,32,21,9,2. Ionization will be the energy required to remove an electron that is the least tightly bound to the atom. In order to completely ionize the atom do I calculate the energy required to ionize each electron at their respective energy levels? I am a bit confused as to how to tackle the problem.
Thanks
 
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  • #2
doppeled said:
What is the maximum wavelength of light required to fully ionised Uranium to U92+, i.e.
strip it of all electrons and leaving a bare nucleus? For simplicity, only consider direct
ionisation and neglect non-linear effects.

[...]

In order to completely ionize the atom do I calculate the energy required to ionize each electron at their respective energy levels?
I think this is where your confusion is coming from: these two statements of the problem are different.

You are not asked the total energy to ionize the atom, but the highest energy photon needed. Consider that one photon removes one electron, what electron will be the hardest to remove?
 
  • #3
Ah yes, I think I understand now. So just a matter of calculating the energy required to remove an electron closest to the nucleus, which is in the ground state.

Thank you for your help.
 
  • #4
doppeled said:
Ah yes, I think I understand now. So just a matter of calculating the energy required to remove an electron closest to the nucleus, which is in the ground state.
Just to make clear, it will be the energy needed to remove the last electron.
 
  • #5
Yes so during ionization the outermost, least bound electrons will be removed first, and so by calculating wavelength required to remove the last electron we have a sufficient energy to completely ionize.
 

Related to Energy required to fully ionize Uranium

What is the energy required to fully ionize Uranium?

The energy required to fully ionize Uranium is 6.2 electron volts (eV) per atom.

How is the energy required to fully ionize Uranium calculated?

The energy required to fully ionize Uranium is calculated using the ionization energy equation, which takes into account the atomic weight and ionization potential of the element.

Why is the energy required to fully ionize Uranium important?

The energy required to fully ionize Uranium is important because it determines the stability and reactivity of the element, as well as its potential uses in nuclear reactions and energy production.

Is the energy required to fully ionize Uranium the same for all isotopes?

No, the energy required to fully ionize Uranium may vary slightly for different isotopes due to differences in their atomic weights and ionization potentials.

Can the energy required to fully ionize Uranium be altered or controlled?

Yes, the energy required to fully ionize Uranium can be altered or controlled through various methods, such as exposing the element to different energy sources or using certain chemical reactions.

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