Engineer Physics Vs Plain Physics

In summary, when considering switching majors from Computer Science to Physics or Engineering Physics, there are pros and cons to both options. Pros for Engineering Physics include the potential for specialization in Computer Science and practicality if not pursuing graduate school. However, this major may require more classes and limit opportunities for independent study or research. On the other hand, Straight Physics may require fewer classes and offer more freedom in electives and time for research, but may limit career options without a graduate degree. It is also important to consider the requirements for PEng/CEng certification, which may differ depending on the country.
  • #1
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I am switching majors over from Computer Science to Physics or Engineering physics and need some advice:

Pros for Engineering Physics:

1. More practical if don't end up heading to grad school.
2. I can specialize in Computer Science within the Engineering Physics major so I would need only two more CS classes towards that.
3. Besides those 2 CS classes only need 3 Engineering Classes: Intro to Engineering, And Circuits I & II with Labs.


Cons for Engineering Physics:
1. Need to take more classes.
2. Will be less room to take more physics and math courses or do independent study or research.


Pros of Straight Physics:
1. Less classes needed.
2. Will give me more freedom with electives and time last few semester to do research or independent studies.
3. Probably not looking to go into a career where I would use the engineering stuff much as I wish to go to grad school in Astro.

Cons of Straight Physics:

1. If I don't make it into grad school I'll be stuck with a physics degree and not as many options.
2. The 3 classes I took for my CS major won't end up counting for much.


Are there are other consideration I am neglecting? When I do apply to grad school does an Engineering Physics degree look any different than a Physics one? What about in the job market?
 
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  • #2
Does the engineering physics count as an engineering degree for PEng/CEng certification?
Does this matter in your country?

A lot of places require PEng/CEng to sign off on certain jobs, other places demand it for certain levels of management - in some countries you can't even call yourself an engineer without one .
 
  • #3


I would advise you to carefully consider your career goals and interests before deciding between Engineering Physics and Plain Physics. Both majors have their own unique advantages and disadvantages, and it ultimately depends on what you want to do in the future.

If you are interested in pursuing a career in industry or working with technology, then Engineering Physics may be a better fit for you. It will provide you with a more practical and hands-on approach to physics and allow you to specialize in a specific field, such as computer science. However, keep in mind that it may require you to take more classes and limit your flexibility in choosing elective courses or doing research.

On the other hand, if your goal is to go to graduate school and pursue a career in research, then a Plain Physics major may be more suitable. It will give you a strong foundation in physics and mathematics, and you will have more freedom to choose elective courses and engage in research or independent studies. However, if you do not get into graduate school, you may have fewer options in terms of job prospects.

It is also important to note that the job market for both Engineering Physics and Plain Physics graduates is constantly evolving. In some industries, an Engineering Physics degree may be preferred, while in others, a Plain Physics degree may be equally valued. It ultimately depends on the specific job and company you are applying to.

In terms of grad school applications, both degrees are equally respectable and will not make a significant difference as long as you have a strong academic record and relevant experience. What matters most is your passion, dedication, and skills in the field of physics.

Overall, my advice would be to carefully consider your career goals and interests, and choose the major that aligns with them. Both Engineering Physics and Plain Physics offer valuable skills and knowledge, and with hard work and determination, you can succeed in either field. Good luck with your decision!
 

Related to Engineer Physics Vs Plain Physics

1. What is the difference between Engineer Physics and Plain Physics?

Engineer Physics is a branch of physics that focuses on applying the principles of physics to engineering problems and designing solutions for practical applications. Plain Physics, also known as theoretical physics, is the study of fundamental laws and theories of nature without any specific application in mind.

2. Do Engineer Physics and Plain Physics have different educational requirements?

Yes, they do. While both fields require a strong foundation in mathematics and physics, Engineer Physics also requires knowledge of engineering principles and practices, as well as hands-on experience with practical applications.

3. Can someone with a degree in Plain Physics work as an engineer?

It is possible, but they may need to gain additional skills and knowledge in engineering principles and practices. Many engineering positions also require a professional engineering license, which typically requires a degree in engineering.

4. Are there different career opportunities for those with a degree in Engineer Physics vs Plain Physics?

Yes, there are. Graduates with a degree in Engineer Physics may have opportunities in fields such as aerospace, civil, or mechanical engineering, while those with a degree in Plain Physics may pursue careers in research, academia, or other industries.

5. Is one field more specialized than the other?

Yes, Engineer Physics is considered a more specialized field, as it combines the principles of physics with a specific engineering discipline. Plain Physics, on the other hand, covers a broader range of topics and may lead to a variety of career paths.

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