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Engineering physics what can I do?

  1. Jan 15, 2009 #1
    I'm planning on going to the U of A and there is an engineering Physics program there, all I have heard about majoring in Physics is that it's not easy to get an engineering job as with a degree in Physics, so I'm wondering about engineering physics, how are the job prospects?

    fyi: the curriculum for Engineering Physics at UA is:

    Basic Physics classes:
    Intro Classical Mechanics
    Intro Optics and Thermodynamics
    Intro Electricity and Magnetism
    Intro Quantum Physics and Special Relativity
    Mathematical Methods in Physics
    Intermediate E&M 1 and 2
    Optics
    Intermediate Classical Mechanics
    Quantum 1 and 2
    Thermal Physics
    Methods in Experimental Physics 1 and 2

    Engineering classes:
    Intro to Engineering
    Mechanics of Solids
    Elements of Electrical Engineering
    Intro to Mat Sciences
    Intro to Fluid Mechanics

    then there are 18 units of technical electives to specialize in a type of engineering.

    thanx
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2009 #2

    MATLABdude

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    EDIT: Post deleted due to irrelevancy to thread
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2009
  4. Jan 16, 2009 #3

    MATLABdude

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    EDIT: Post deleted due to irrelevancy to thread
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2009
  5. Jan 16, 2009 #4
    Thanx for the insight! It's helpful! I guess i should have been more specific, I'm not going to University of Alberta...I'm going to the University of Arizona...lol
     
  6. Jan 28, 2009 #5
    It depends what country you are in. In the US, it may be tough to find such a job.
     
  7. Jan 28, 2009 #6

    Choppy

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    It's probably better to base your career decisions on hard facts rather than grapevine rumours. There are lots of jobs out there for people with physics degrees, they're just not necessarily advertised as for someone with a physics degree.

    The advantage of engineering physics is that it can qualify you to eventually become a professional engineer.
     
  8. Jan 28, 2009 #7
    TRUE! but I think it may be fair to say that physics is closely tied to philosophy. And like most philosophers your primary job opportunities, at least in the US, will be teaching. Or perhaps military R&D. The basic relationship is that physicists develop the laws of the universe and the engineers use it to do something. both have aspects of each other, but as a whole are very different.
     
  9. Jan 28, 2009 #8

    Choppy

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    Here's a breakdown of Canadian physics graduates who received a B.Sc. in physics from 1985-1996. Of these, roughly 25% had gone on to complete a M.Sc. as their highest degree and 25% had gone on to complete a Ph.D.
    * Research and Development - 25.8%
    * Teaching - 24.1%
    * Computing - 12.2%
    * Health Sciences - 6.2%
    * Management and administration - 4.6%
    * Product Development - 4.0%
    * Consulting - 4.0%
    * Sales and Marketing - 3.4%
    * Other - 15.8%
    https://www.cap.ca/careers/home/employmentprospects.html


    I don't know how the study question was worded, but people in academia play multiple roles teaching and in research.

    I don't think it's fair to equate physicists with philosophers and imply their job opportunities will be primarily as teachers.
     
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