Entangled particles inside a black-hole

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of studying black holes by entangling particles and sending them into a black hole. However, it is explained that this would not work due to the nature of black holes and the limitations of entanglement. The concept of entanglement and its instantaneous nature is also discussed, along with the idea of time freezing for an entangled particle near a black hole's event horizon. The concept of firewalls in black holes is also mentioned as a potential crisis in physics.
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Would it be possible to study black-holes just by entangling particles and sending some of them right into a black-hole?
 
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  • #2
Mectaresh said:
Would it possible to study black-holes just by entangling particles and sending some of them right into a black-hole?

Since absolutely nothing can come out of a black hole, how would you "study" anything you sent in?
 
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Interesting idea, but unfortunately, no. You can only even detect entanglement if you have both partners at hands and look for the specific correlation that comes with entanglement. So for a single system you cannot even tell if it's entangled at all with some remote system, and twice not if that remote system is inaccessibly hidden in a black hole!

Cheers,

Jazz
 
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  • #4
Mectaresh said:
Would it possible to study black-holes just by entangling particles and sending some of them right into a black-hole?

Are you considering dropping one member of an entangled pair into the black hole and trying to figure out what happen to it by watching the other member outside the black hole? That won't for exactly the same reason that you cannot use entanglement to send faster-than-light (or slower than light, for that matter) signals. If you search this forum you'll find some threads in which this is explained.
 
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  • #5
Mectaresh said:
Would it possible to study black-holes just by entangling particles and sending some of them right into a black-hole?

Welcome to PhysicsForums, Mectaresh!

You cannot learn anything useful from sending particles into a black hole and measuring its partner outside. You will see only a series of random results. That is the same as if you send the partner into deep space. Or across the lab room for that matter.
 
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  • #6
Nugatory said:
Are you considering dropping one member of an entangled pair into the black hole and trying to figure out what happen to it by watching the other member outside the black hole? That won't for exactly the same reason that you cannot use entanglement to send faster-than-light (or slower than light, for that matter) signals. If you search this forum you'll find some threads in which this is explained.
Most of my knowledge about quantum mechanics comes from TV shows,I a not trying to argue here,but I am quite sure I heard more than once that only information cannot travel faster than the speed of light and that entanglement is instant.
I must admit that the instantaneous reaction of the entangled particle regardless of the distance that separates it from its partner is the most bizarre and unsettling concept I ever heard of .
I don't understand how is that even possible !
 
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DrChinese said:
Welcome to PhysicsForums, Mectaresh!

You cannot learn anything useful from sending particles into a black hole and measuring its partner outside. You will see only a series of random results. That is the same as if you send the partner into deep space. Or across the lab room for that matter.

Thanks for your warm welcome DrChinese,

I have another question on my mind if you don't mind me asking !
I learned that before an object enters the event horizon it sort of freezes in time(from another observer's perspective).
The entangled partner in the lab is technically both observing its partner frozen in time and seeing itself entering the event horizon.
Here is the twisted question:
How would time pass for the entangled partner in lab and most importantly would it be possible to see it freeze in time?
 
  • #8
Mectaresh said:
Most of my knowledge about quantum mechanics comes from TV shows,I a not trying to argue here,but I am quite sure I heard more than once that only information cannot travel faster than the speed of light and that entanglement is instant.
I must admit that the instantaneous reaction of the entangled particle regardless of the distance that separates it from its partner is the most bizarre and unsettling concept I ever heard of .
I don't understand how is that even possible !

NEVER EVER EVER EVER believe what you hear on TV about science. They get a lot of it right, but they get so much of it WAY wrong that you have to just not trust them about anything.

Information can NOT travel faster than the speed of light. NOTHING can travel faster than c.

Entanglement IS instantaneous, but no information is transmitted and yes, this is REALLY bizarre. I was dumbfounded when I was first introduced to the concept. It's complicated and you need to read up on entanglement to understand it.
 
  • #9
Mectaresh said:
Would it be possible to study black-holes just by entangling particles and sending some of them right into a black-hole?
that thing is creating a crisis in physics, maybe the information or unitarity is lost, read firewalls.Black Hole Firewalls
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=622022
 
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1. What are entangled particles?

Entangled particles are two or more particles that are connected in such a way that the state of one particle affects the state of the other, even if they are separated by large distances.

2. How does entanglement occur inside a black hole?

Inside a black hole, the intense gravitational pull causes space and time to warp significantly. This distortion can lead to the entanglement of particles that were previously unentangled.

3. Can entangled particles inside a black hole be observed or measured?

No, currently there is no way to observe or measure entangled particles inside a black hole. The intense gravitational forces make it impossible for any information to escape, including information about the state of entangled particles.

4. How does entanglement inside a black hole affect our understanding of quantum mechanics?

The existence of entangled particles inside a black hole challenges our understanding of quantum mechanics, as it raises questions about the nature of space and time and the limitations of our current theories.

5. Are entangled particles inside a black hole related to the phenomenon of Hawking radiation?

Currently, there is no direct evidence to suggest a connection between entangled particles inside a black hole and Hawking radiation. However, some theories suggest that entanglement may play a role in the emission of Hawking radiation from black holes.

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