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Equivalence point concentration/number of moles

  1. Nov 23, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Fe[3+]+V[2+]-->Fe[2+]+V[3+]

    If you start with 0.1000 M solutions and the first-named species is the titrant, what will be
    the concentration of each reactant and product at the equivalence point of the titrations above? Assume that there is no change in [H+] during the titration.

    2. Relevant equations

    Keq=[V3+][Fe2+]/[V2+][Fe3+]=2.23X10^17


    3. The attempt at a solution

    I believe V2+ and Fe3+ will be the same at the equivalence points since that is the definition of the analyte and titrant. However, I was told that the V3+ and Fe2+ concentration is 0.1000/2. Could someone please explain why it is divided by 2 and not just 0.1000? Thank you
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 24, 2012 #2

    symbolipoint

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    Homework Helper
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    Stoichiometry should be enough. Write the balanced reaction. You are using 1 to 1 mole ratio for the reaction. How does this relate to volume of titrant and volume of analyte solution? The resulting volume, if both concentrations are 0.1000, should be.....? Think... you will see.
     
  4. Nov 24, 2012 #3
    Ok just to make sure. The total volume will be 2L? Because of that, we take 0.1000mol/2?
     
  5. Nov 24, 2012 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, just a simple dilution.
     
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