Euler-Lagrange equation application

  • #1
328
0

Homework Statement



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Homework Equations



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The Attempt at a Solution



I have tried manipulating the equation a few different ways, but the Euler-Lagrange and the one I'm supposed to show for a) is so different that I just can't seem to work. Can someone please point me in the right direction here?
 
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  • #2
I think you don't need the Euler-Lagrange equation for (a). That looks like the standard derivative, just calculate it.
 
  • #3
Well, just calculating the derivative, I'm not sure why it is coming out the way it is? I get that the "t" component would be zeros, cancelling out its parts. However, I'm not sure what derivative/partial derivative rules are being applied to get the equation to look like the one asked for in a)?
 
  • #4
Think chain rule. If you still can't figure it out, show us your attempt.
 

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