Even lighting at an oblique angle

In summary, Dave's Brain Project 241a is looking for a way to light a half dozen pictures in 5x7 frames in a display in the corner of his living room, but he is having difficulty finding a solution that is both bright and easy to see. Two solutions have been proposed, but neither is satisfactory because of the distance and obliquity of the lights. He is open to suggestions, but has some restrictions, including the need for a small amount of heat generation and the occupied space of the display.
  • #1
DaveC426913
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DavesBrain Project 241a - lighting framed pictures

I want to light a half dozen pictures in 5x7 frames in a display in the corner of my living room (this display will likely be free-standing, like a privacy screen), but I don't want http://www.ikea.com.sg/products/product_display.asp?id=2237" . The room is somewhat dimly lit i.e. not enough to do justice to the pics.

I'm looking for lighting solutions. Maybe you guys'll think of something I didn't.

My two attempts so far (see attached file):
1] http://www.ikea.com.sg/products/product_display.asp?id=820" mounted near the ceiling, only one per column of pictures. Problem: lights dim with distance and obliquity.

2] Shadow box frames with 3' of rope light sandwiched between two mattes. Lights are now right next to picture but hidden behind a second matte. I love this solution! Problem: same, really - the string of lights are just not bright enough and are still too oblique. I'm also worried about the unevenness of the light from the rope. My next experiment will be to line the entire picture with white LEDs and see if it's enough light.

I'm open to suggestions.

I do have some restrictions:
- heat generation inside boxes (LED good, incandescent bad)
- occupied space - I could always move the lights in pic 1 farther back on the ceiling and increase their strength, but I don't want to dominate the whole corner of the room with equipment -or- with light. The more hidden the better.


Anyone have any improvements or other ideas?
 

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  • #2
Have you considered mounting high-intensity white LED's countersunk into the inner bottom edges of the frames? With diffuser lenses, they might provide a nice even illumination.

edit: Okay, how did you sneak the double-matte and LED stuff into your post after I wrote this, and still show your edit as before me? :-p
 
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  • #3
They make recessed lighting for just this purpose. The ones I have seen were small globes that could be rotated and did have a relatively small spread to the beam.

I have seen them like this that have the entire housing and a pivoting lamp:
http://www.lighting-fixtures-ceiling-fans.com/store/images/HALO_H1499IC.jpg

And I have seen these that are along the same lines, but without the large housing:
http://www.pegasusassociates.com/products/RecessedLighting/images/4itrimslowvolt/PNL-419-C.jpg
http://www.pegasusassociates.com/products/RecessedLighting/images/4itrimslowvolt/PNL-470-W%20-%20Adjustable.jpg
 
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  • #4
Danger said:
Have you considered mounting high-intensity white LED's countersunk into the inner bottom edges of the frames? With diffuser lenses, they might provide a nice even illumination.

edit: Okay, how did you sneak the double-matte and LED stuff into your post after I wrote this, and still show your edit as before me? :-p
What is this diffuser lens thing? I'm thinking of trying some sort of prismatic lens to direct thet light onto the picture, but that'd be almost impossible to construct (and I'll need 32 sections!)
 
  • #5
Hey, Dave. I just used 'diffuser lens' as a generic term to describe the effect. It can be a really thin layer of frosted glass/plastic, or even just a light coat of nail polish or varnish on the LED. The idea is just to 'fan' the light rather than having it more focused. The trick is to do it without a lot of transmission loss. Another trick is to angle the lights so they overlap in a criss-cross pattern to eliminate shadows.
 

Related to Even lighting at an oblique angle

What is even lighting at an oblique angle?

Even lighting at an oblique angle refers to the distribution of light across a surface that is not directly facing the light source. This means that the light is evenly spread out and there are no areas of shadow or brightness on the surface.

Why is even lighting at an oblique angle important?

Even lighting at an oblique angle is important because it helps to eliminate shadows and glare, which can affect the accuracy of visual perception and distort the appearance of objects. This is especially important in industries such as photography, film, and product design where accurate representation and perception of objects is crucial.

How is even lighting at an oblique angle achieved?

Even lighting at an oblique angle can be achieved through the use of diffusers, reflectors, and light modifiers. These tools help to spread out and soften the light, creating a more even distribution across the surface. Proper positioning and angle of the light source is also important in achieving even lighting.

What are the benefits of even lighting at an oblique angle?

The benefits of even lighting at an oblique angle include improved visual perception and accuracy, reduced glare and shadows, and a more balanced and aesthetically pleasing appearance. In industries such as photography and film, even lighting can also save time and effort in post-production editing.

Can even lighting at an oblique angle be achieved naturally?

Yes, even lighting at an oblique angle can be achieved naturally depending on the positioning and intensity of the natural light source. For example, during sunrise or sunset when the sun is at an oblique angle, the light can create a soft and even distribution across surfaces. However, in controlled environments such as studios, artificial lighting is often used to achieve more precise and consistent even lighting.

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