Find Spring Position After Attaching 2.7kg Mass

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In summary, the end of a spring with a spring constant of 47 N/m and attached to a ruler at the 15 cm mark will line up at 141 cm when a 2.7 kg mass is attached. The extension of the spring can be found using the formula 0+mg(0.15m + change in y)=0+ .5k(change in y)^2. However, this answer may not be correct and further assistance is needed.
  • #1
bosox3790
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A spring with k = 47 N/m hangs vertically next to a ruler. The end of the spring is next to the 15 cm mark on the ruler. If a 2.7 kg mass is now attached to the end of the spring, where will the end of the spring line up with the ruler marks?

I got the answer to be 141 cm because I thought that the 15cm is to be converted into meters, can anyone help me with this question?
 
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  • #2
yes the cm should be converted to metres

what is the extension as a result of the mass being attached?
 
  • #3
I got 141 cm but that's not correct. I can't figure out the correct answer.
 
  • #4
bosox3790 said:
I got 141 cm but that's not correct. I can't figure out the correct answer.

how did u get that?
 
  • #5
I used 0+mg(0.15m + change in y)=0+ .5k(change in y)^2
 

Related to Find Spring Position After Attaching 2.7kg Mass

1. How do you determine the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass?

To determine the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass, you will need to use Hooke's Law, which states that the force applied to a spring is directly proportional to the displacement of the spring. You will also need to know the spring constant, which can be found by dividing the force applied by the displacement. By knowing the spring constant and the force applied by the 2.7kg mass, you can calculate the displacement of the spring.

2. What is the formula for finding the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass?

The formula for finding the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass is x = F/k, where x is the displacement of the spring, F is the force applied by the mass, and k is the spring constant. This formula is derived from Hooke's Law.

3. Can the spring position be negative after attaching a 2.7kg mass?

Yes, the spring position can be negative after attaching a 2.7kg mass. This would indicate that the spring has been compressed or stretched in the opposite direction of its natural resting position. The negative value simply indicates the direction of displacement, not necessarily the magnitude.

4. How does the spring position change with different masses?

The spring position will change with different masses because the force applied to the spring will vary. According to Hooke's Law, the displacement of the spring is directly proportional to the force applied. Therefore, a larger mass will result in a greater force and a larger displacement of the spring.

5. What factors can affect the accuracy of determining the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass?

There are a few factors that can affect the accuracy of determining the spring position after attaching a 2.7kg mass. These include variations in the spring constant, external forces acting on the spring, and human error in measurement. To ensure the most accurate results, it is important to use a consistent and precise measuring device and to minimize any external factors that may affect the spring's displacement.

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