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Find the speed of the block at this point

  1. Apr 17, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A 2.00 kg block situated on a frictionless incline is connected to a spring of negligible mass having a spring constant of 100 N/m. The block is released from rest when the spring is unstretched, and the pulley is frictionless. The block moves 23.0 cm down the incline of 37 degrees. Find the speed of the block at this point. ive included a picture at the bottom.


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     

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    Last edited: Apr 17, 2008
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 17, 2008 #2
    i can't seem to edit my thread
    2. Relevant equations

    ive tried using the equation of KE=1/2mv^2 and also W=1/2x^2
    i've basically done everything i can without any progress.
    are there any other equations or ways of doing this type of question?
    thank you

    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  4. Apr 17, 2008 #3

    tiny-tim

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    Welcome to PF!

    Hi fizwiz! Welcome to PF! :smile:

    I don't understand why conservation of energy isn't doing it …

    KE + energy of spring + gravitational PE = constant.

    What numbers are you getting? :smile:
     
  5. Apr 18, 2008 #4
    hi tiny-tim
    i havent actaully tried it using your way..
    which equations would you use?
     
  6. Apr 18, 2008 #5

    tiny-tim

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    Hi fizwiz! :smile:

    I would use: KE + energy of spring + gravitational PE = constant.

    KE, as you say, is 1/2mv².

    (btw, what was your W?)

    So … what is the formula for the gravitational PE for a drop of h?

    And what is the formula for the energy of the spring when its length is x? :smile:
     
  7. Apr 18, 2008 #6
    thanks for your help! :)
    i think ive worked out the answer using those equations
     
  8. Apr 18, 2008 #7

    tiny-tim

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    :biggrin: Woohoo! :biggrin:

    ( :smile: … don't forget to click on "Thread Tools" to mark the thread [SOLVED] … )
     
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