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Finding distance based off acceleration

  1. Oct 6, 2007 #1
    [SOLVED] finding distance based off acceleration

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A car slows down uniformly from a speed of 26.0 m/s to rest in 4.50 s. How far did it travel in that time?

    2. Relevant equations
    Acceleration (you all know it)


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I am totally stuck all I can do is find acceleration ...-5.78m/s^2
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 6, 2007 #2

    learningphysics

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    What kinematics formulas do you know for uniform acceleration? displacement formulas...
     
  4. Oct 6, 2007 #3

    Kurdt

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    Last edited: Oct 6, 2007
  5. Oct 6, 2007 #4
    [tex]x = x_0 + v_0 t + (1/2) a t^2[/tex] Should I try using this?
     
  6. Oct 6, 2007 #5

    learningphysics

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    you can do that since you've calculated acceleration.

    you can also use [tex]d = \frac{(v1 + v2)}{2}*t[/tex]

    which also gives you the answer.
     
  7. Oct 6, 2007 #6
    45.495m is that right?
     
  8. Oct 6, 2007 #7

    learningphysics

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    No. how did you get that?
     
  9. Oct 6, 2007 #8
    I accidentally pluged accel. in for velocity
     
  10. Oct 6, 2007 #9
    so.. 26*4.5-1/2(-5.78) what am I missing
     
  11. Oct 6, 2007 #10
    58.5?....v1 26m/s v2 0m/s t=4.5
     
  12. Oct 6, 2007 #11

    Kurdt

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    You should add on the acceleraton term and multiply it by the time squared.
     
  13. Oct 6, 2007 #12

    Kurdt

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    That is correct.
     
  14. Oct 6, 2007 #13
    I totally was making that harder than it was, I would like to thank you for your help
     
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