Finding the tension and components

In summary: The force at the hinge is F_7, which acts in the counterclockwise direction. The other four forces are directed away from the hinge. The first two are F_8 and F_9, which are directed down and to the left (toward the wall), the third is F_5, which is directed down and to the right (toward the floor), and the fourth is F_6, which is directed up and to the right (toward the ceiling).In summary, the horizontal beam in the figure below weighs 140 N, and its center of gravity is at its center. The tension in the cable is F_10 (10 N). The horizontal and vertical component of the force exerted on the beam at the
  • #1
cece
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The horizontal beam in the figure below weighs 140 N, and its center of gravity is at its center.

http://session.masteringphysics.com/problemAsset/1026448/22/yg.10.59.jpg

Find the tension in the cable.

Find the horizontal and vertical component of the force exerted on the beam at the wall.


How would I solve this?
 
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  • #2
You'll have to use Newton's second law, and Newton's second law for rotation (that is, the torque equation). Note that the beam is in equilibrium, so what can you say about its translational and angular acceleration? Also, you'll want to start by identifying all of the forces on the beam (Hint: There are 5 forces.) Drawing a free body diagram for the forces and for the torque will help you greatly.
 
  • #3
the formula is t(net external)=I(moment of inertia) x a (angular acceleration). i still don't know how to identify and plug in the values.
 
  • #4
You should know that Newton's second law [tex] \vec{F}_{NET} = m\vec{a} [/tex] breaks down into:

[tex] F_x = F_1 + F_2 = 0 [/tex]

[tex] F_y = F_3 + F_4 + F_5 + F_6 = 0 [/tex]

Now all you have to do is identify what these components are.

And you should know that to find the net torque, you simply add the torques due to each force. To make life simple, take the torque about the right end of the beam. If we take counter clockwise to be positive, you'll have:

[tex] \tau_{NET} = F_7(R_7) - F_8(R_8) + F_9(R_9) = 0 [/tex]

One of these torques will go to zero. Taking the coordinate system into account, it will be the torque caused my F9. Why is this? Again, you would do well to make a free body diagram. One for the forces, and one for the torques.
 
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  • #5
can you solve it for me, step by step with the correct answer.. so i can understand what your talking about and using the same strategy for the next 5 problems.
 
  • #6
If I solve it for you, you won't learn anything. But I'll gladly help you work through it. The first step would be drawing a free body diagram, and identifying all of the forces. Here's a hint to get you started: There are five forces, two of them act at the hinge of the beam. Can you tell me what these five forces are, and in which direction they act?
 

Related to Finding the tension and components

1. What is tension and why is it important to find?

Tension is a force that is exerted on an object or material, causing it to stretch or deform. It is important to find tension because understanding the amount of tension in a system can help predict how it will behave and whether it can withstand certain forces.

2. How is tension measured?

Tension is typically measured in units of force, such as pounds or newtons. It can be measured using a variety of instruments, such as tension meters or strain gauges, which can accurately measure the amount of force being applied to an object.

3. What are the components of tension?

Tension is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction. The two components of tension are the magnitude (the amount of force being applied) and the direction (the direction in which the force is being applied).

4. How can tension be calculated?

Tension can be calculated using the formula T = F/A, where T is tension, F is the force being applied, and A is the cross-sectional area of the material under tension. This formula assumes that the tension is evenly distributed across the entire cross-sectional area.

5. What factors can affect tension?

Tension can be affected by several factors including the amount of force being applied, the type and properties of the material under tension, and the direction in which the force is being applied. Temperature and external forces can also impact tension in a system.

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