Finding the wavelength of this wave

  • Thread starter -Dragoon-
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Okay, here is a photo of the wave I did on a graphing program: http://img221.imageshack.us/i/wavelengthsgraph.jpg/

Now the total distance the wave travels is 4.8 M. There are 3 crests and 3 troughs, but there is only 2 wavelengths throughout the wave. This confuses me.

Homework Equations


To finding the wavelength is it 4.8/2? Or 4.8 divided by 3?


The Attempt at a Solution


I tried 4.8/3, but I didn't feel to comfortable with the answer since the wavelengths do not seem to be 1.6 M long, so would it become 4.8/2=2.4M?

And how would I know how to determine the answer for future equations? Thanks in advance.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
fss
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There are only 3 complete cycles of that particular wave in 4.8 meters, so the wavelength is 4.8/3. Not sure what you mean by "there is only 2 wavelengths throughout the wave."
 
  • #3
309
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There are only 3 complete cycles of that particular wave in 4.8 meters, so the wavelength is 4.8/3. Not sure what you mean by "there is only 2 wavelengths throughout the wave."

So the wavelength is essentially the total distance/complete number of cycles?
 
  • #4
fss
1,179
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Yes, essentially.
 
  • #5
309
7
Yes, essentially.

Wow, okay thanks for this. Solved most of the confusion I had over this. :smile:
 
  • #6
309
7
Just one more question: If the frequency is changed, the velocity and wavelength remain the same, right?
 
  • #7
fss
1,179
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No...

c = f*lambda

c stays the same.
 

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