Fluid Least Likely to Leak Through O-Ring?

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In summary, when building a prototype with a steel rod and a small O-Ring, it is important to select a fluid that is chemically compatible with the O-Ring's elastomer. Proper gland design is also crucial for a leak-free installation. The fluid should not freeze at 25 degrees Fahrenheit and should be relatively incompressible. Viscosity is a determining factor in selecting the appropriate fluid, and options such as hydraulic fluid, engine oil, canola oil, glycerin, and antifreeze are all suitable. The surface finish of the steel rod should also be taken into consideration.
  • #1
BasketDaN
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I am building a prototype, and I was just wondering what fluid I should use that is the least likely to seap through the interface of a steel rod and a small O-Ring, as the steel rod moves forward through the O-Ring. This fluid should not freeze at 25 degrees fahrenheit, and should be relatively incompressible.

Thanks!
 
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  • #2
You need to select something that is chemically compatible with the elastomer the o-ring is made of. That combined with proper gland design will be the only way to ensure a leak free installation.
 
  • #3
This actually doesn't need to last long, just a day or two so I can use this once. High performance also isn't particularly important, just that nothing leaks out the seal. I guess I am wondering what the highest viscosity fluid would be that wouldn't freeze in a freezer. (Is it viscosity that would determine this?)
 
  • #4
Hydraulic fluid, engine oil, canola oil, glycerin, antifreeze, etc...pretty much anything that's doesn't have water as a major component.
 
  • #5
What's the surface finish of the steel rod?
 

Related to Fluid Least Likely to Leak Through O-Ring?

1. What is the most common fluid that leaks through O-rings?

The most common fluid that leaks through O-rings is oil. This is because oil is highly viscous and can easily seep through any small gaps or imperfections in the O-ring seal.

2. What are some factors that can contribute to O-ring leakage?

Some factors that can contribute to O-ring leakage include high pressure or temperature, chemical compatibility issues, improper installation or sizing of the O-ring, and wear and tear over time.

3. Is there a specific type of O-ring material that is more resistant to fluid leakage?

Yes, there are certain O-ring materials that are more resistant to fluid leakage. Some examples include silicone, fluorocarbon, and perfluoroelastomer, which have high chemical resistance and can withstand extreme temperatures and pressures.

4. Can O-rings be repaired if they are leaking?

In most cases, O-rings cannot be repaired if they are leaking. It is best to replace the O-ring with a new one to ensure a proper seal and prevent further leakage.

5. How can O-ring leakage be prevented?

O-ring leakage can be prevented by choosing the right type of O-ring material for the specific fluid and application, ensuring proper installation and sizing, and regularly inspecting and replacing O-rings that show signs of wear or damage.

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