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From applied mathematics to physics.

  1. Feb 14, 2014 #1
    I am currently an undergraduate student at a department of applied mathematics.

    Its a 4 years (240 ects) program in which I can take lots of physics classes directly from the department of physics of my university as well.

    The thing is that I start to believe that I like more to do physics unfortunately I don't know if that is a viable option for me.

    What I mean is that I don't know if I can pursue a physics Ph.D (lets say on something relevant to theoretical physics) after my graduation.

    Is it mandatory to get a masters degree in physics first, in order to be accepted for a Ph.D in physics because my degree will be more relevant to mathematics?

    I apologize for my English its just that I am not a native speaker (also I don't study in an English speaking university ) but of course I will continue studying English with the hope to be more than proficient when I manage to get my degree because I aim to continue my academic career in USA or England.

    I thank you in advance for your advise.
     
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  3. Feb 14, 2014 #2

    ZapperZ

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  4. Feb 14, 2014 #3
    Thank you for your post.

    Something more acute to my question precise and quick? I just want to know if its theoretically and practically possible to go directly for a Ph.D in physics (USA/England) having a degree in applied mathematics

    I will read the topic on your link but currently I can't since I have to prepare for my exams :P
     
  5. Feb 14, 2014 #4

    jgens

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    Yes it is definitely possible. I know several people who did exactly that in the past couple years.
     
  6. Feb 14, 2014 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    I doubt you will make a good physicist. Seriously. Zz pointed you to a link that answered your question, and was filled with other information you will need and you are turning your nose up at it because it isn't "precise and quick" enough for you. Most successful physicists do not ask to be spoon fed answers, and most successful people do not make it a habit to be rude and obnoxious to people who are trying to help you.
     
  7. Feb 14, 2014 #6

    AlephZero

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    UK and US concepts of "undergraduate applied math" may be different. For example, here are some of the options from a (randomly selected, Russell Group,) UK university for 3rd year "applied maths:"

    Statistical Physics
    Quantum Physics of Atoms
    Electrodynamics
    Cosmology
    Plasma Electrodynamics
    Solar Magnetohydrodynamics
    Relativity and Electrodynamics
    Statistical Mechanics of Complex Systems
    Optoelectronics and Laser Physics
    Astro Physics
    Relativistic Quantum Mechanics
    Scattering and Spectroscopy
    Gauge Theories for Particle Physics
    General Relativity

    Those courses would most likely be delivered by the Physics department, but the UK doesn't have the "major and minor" division in its degree system - the end result would be a degree certificate that just says "maths".
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  8. Feb 14, 2014 #7

    pasmith

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    Indeed there exists a Russell Group university where Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics are lumped in the same department.
     
  9. Feb 14, 2014 #8
    Thanks for your responses :)

    well you seem to be the lazy one and rude as well.... 1st I did thank ZapperZ for his post 2nd I didnt say that I will not read the topic on the link he gave me infact I already mentioned that I will do so 3rd I just finished reviewing 500 pages of theory on which I will have to be examed tomorrow I didnt had the luxury to read all this stuff today but still was eager to get an answer (to a simple question it was a matter of information I didnt ask something that needs deep understanding practice etc.)

    Also to jump hasty and carelessly into conclusions is not a good trait for any scientist even for a chemist :P


    Well thats exactly how it works here in Greece (were I study) half of my classes are physics and chemistry lectures but my degree will state Applied Mathematics :P
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  10. Feb 14, 2014 #9

    Vanadium 50

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    My objection was not one of preparation (although the case can be made) but one of temperament.
     
  11. Feb 14, 2014 #10

    Physics_UG

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    It is definitely possible. You might have to take some remedial classes though in physics. I recommend you take an upper division classical mechanics class, upper div EM, Stat Mechanics, and quantum mechanics in undergrad to make yourself more competitive.
     
  12. Feb 14, 2014 #11

    Physics_UG

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    Don't worry. Vanadium is typically a bit terse and brash in his responses around here.
     
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