Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Giant Collision, the Jupiter in the Recent Past

  1. Jun 25, 2013 #1
    It appears that a big planet size body collided with Jupiter in the recent past, What all are the evidences required to prove a recent big collision on a planet?

    1) Jupiter's diameter was increased nearly 50% when comparing modern values with ancient Indian astronomical text Surya-siddhanta.

    2) Big collision possibly creates a new moon, there a new moon closely orbiting Jupiter called Io.

    3) Jupiter's The Great Red Spot was probably created by the collision.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2013 #2
    1) The ancient Indians didn't have telescopes. I don't think measuring the size of Jupiter with the naked eye is feasible

    2) A colission of an io size object with jupiter however, would certainly be visible with the naked eye.
    try to compute the amout of energy involved here.

    3) how do you know? This seems overly speculative
     
  4. Jun 25, 2013 #3
    Willem2 thanks for your feedback,

    Planetary diameters in Surya-siddhanta
    http://www.scientificexploration.org/journal/jse_11_2_thompson.pdf [Broken]

    Though ancient Indian didn't have telescopes, They calculated the planets diameter with other techniques which predicts Mercury and Saturn's diameters with less than 1% error compared to modern standards.

    The collision could have occurred few hundreds years ago, which possibly created the moon Io.

    http://vixra.org/pdf/1305.0113v1.pdf analysis a big collision.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Jun 25, 2013 #4

    Bandersnatch

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    These papers are not valid sources as per the rules of PF. They're full of bad, bad science.
    You shouldn't rely on non-peer reviewed papers if you want trustworthy information.

    But the hypothesis is easy to disprove. 2x increase in diametre means eight times the volume. The colliding body would be very large and massive, almost as big as Jupiter itself. People all over the world would be aware of its existence, of which there is no trace, even in the Indian text you base your speculation on.

    The conclusion is: the measurements were bad, no point in trying to justify them.
     
  6. Jun 25, 2013 #5
    Bandersnatch thanks for your reply,

    >>You shouldn't rely on non-peer reviewed papers
    The paper that talks about Surya-siddhanta was published in Journal of Scienti$c Exploration, Vol. 1 1 , No. 2, pp. 193-200, 1997 (Sorry, But I am not sure whether it is valid source or not)

    The second paper that talks about the collision is not peer reviewed, Since I do not have any University affiliation uploaded it in Vixra.org for a proof.


    >> 2x increase in diametre means eight times the volume.
    We may not be able explain that a single collision doubled the planets diameter, but it could be possible that collided planet was most likely a gas giant and the heat released from the collision caused the gas to expand in volume. The collided planet came from outer orbit of saturn explains that it was most probably a frozen gas giant. The planet would be noticed by ancients astronomers if it was a inner planet, there were no missing planets in our ancient records.

    >>People all over the world would be aware of its existence
    The collision possibly occurred few hundred (or thousand) year ago, before Galileo Galilei observe it. Because moon Io was discovered nearly 400 years back. And the moon Io is having all features that we expect from a new moon.

    But my question here is what are all the evidences required to prove a giant collision on a planet in the recent past (apart from eye witness ).
     
  7. Jun 25, 2013 #6

    D H

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Thread closed pending moderation.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Giant Collision, the Jupiter in the Recent Past
  1. Where is the past? (Replies: 2)

Loading...