Golf Ball Problem-elastic collision

In summary, the problem is to find the final speed of the clubhead after it strikes a golf ball. The head of the club is 176g and is moving at 45m/s, while the golf ball has a mass of 46g and is sent off at 65m/s. The mass of the club's shaft is neglected. The problem can be treated as a routine impact problem by considering the mass and initial and final velocities of the clubhead and ball.
  • #1
ihatephysics7
1
0

Homework Statement


The 176g head of a golf club is moving at 45m/s when it strikes a 46g golf ball and sends it off at 65m/s. Find the final speed of the clubhead after the impact, neglect the mass of the club's shaft.


Homework Equations


No clue.


The Attempt at a Solution


Don't even know.
 
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  • #2
I suggest that you forget that it is a golf club and just treat it as a block striking a ball. You have the mass of the block and its initial velocity. You have the mass of the ball and its final velocity. It is a routine impact problem.
 
  • #3


I can provide a response to this content by using the principles of elastic collisions and conservation of momentum. In this problem, we can assume that the collision between the golf club head and the golf ball is elastic, meaning that there is no loss of kinetic energy during the collision.

Using the conservation of momentum equation, we can set the initial momentum of the clubhead equal to the final momentum of the clubhead and golf ball combined. This can be written as:

m1v1 = (m1 + m2)v2

Where m1 is the mass of the clubhead, v1 is the initial velocity of the clubhead, m2 is the mass of the golf ball, and v2 is the final velocity of the clubhead and golf ball combined.

Substituting the given values of mass and velocity, we can solve for v2:

(0.176 kg)(45 m/s) = (0.176 kg + 0.046 kg)v2
7.92 kg*m/s = 0.222 kg*v2
v2 = 35.68 m/s

Therefore, the final velocity of the clubhead after the impact is 35.68 m/s.

It is important to note that this solution neglects the mass of the club's shaft, which may have a small effect on the final velocity. Additionally, there may be other factors at play in a real-world scenario, such as air resistance, that could affect the final velocity. However, for the purpose of this problem, the given information is sufficient to calculate the final velocity using the principles of elastic collisions.
 

Related to Golf Ball Problem-elastic collision

What is the "Golf Ball Problem" and what does it involve?

The "Golf Ball Problem" is a classic physics problem that involves the concept of elastic collisions. It describes the scenario where two objects, in this case two golf balls, collide with each other and bounce off each other without any loss of kinetic energy.

How is the "Golf Ball Problem" solved?

The "Golf Ball Problem" is solved using the principles of conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy. These laws state that the total momentum and total kinetic energy of a system before and after a collision must remain constant.

What factors affect the outcome of the "Golf Ball Problem"?

The outcome of the "Golf Ball Problem" is affected by the mass and velocity of the golf balls, as well as the angle and speed of their initial approach. Other factors such as air resistance and the elasticity of the balls can also play a role in the outcome.

How is the "Golf Ball Problem" relevant in real life?

The "Golf Ball Problem" is relevant in real life as it helps us to understand and predict the behavior of objects in motion, such as in sports like golf and billiards. It also has practical applications in engineering and design, such as in the development of crash-resistant materials.

Are there any limitations to the "Golf Ball Problem" model?

Yes, the "Golf Ball Problem" model has certain limitations. It assumes that the collision between the golf balls is perfectly elastic, which is not always the case in real life. It also does not take into account factors such as spin and rotation of the balls, which can affect the outcome of the collision.

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