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Gravity and massless particles

  1. May 19, 2016 #1
    Just finished reading Sean Carroll's "The Higgs Boson and Beyond". I would be grateful if someone could explain how gravity, which I understand to be a function of mass, can interact with massless particles as evidenced by the phenomenon of gravitational lensing. I understand that gravity is a local curvature of spacetime and photons move through spacetime so that makes sense. Is the explanation as simple as that?

    Thanks and regards.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 19, 2016 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

  4. May 19, 2016 #3
    Yes but would massless particles like photons moving through space make gravity.
    So in effect could massless particles moving through space time attract each other.
     
  5. May 19, 2016 #4
  6. May 19, 2016 #5

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes. In general relativity, the "source" of gravity is the stress-energy tensor, whose components contain the energy and momentum of an object. Mass is only one form of energy.
     
  7. May 20, 2016 #6
    Energy mass equivalence, gravity can also therefore be described as a function of energy.
     
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