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Has anyone changed their name? I want something more unique

  1. Jul 18, 2012 #1
    People judge others on their name. It shouldn't be that way, but it is.

    And even beyond judgement, there's the "memorable" factor. An artist can put out great work, but if their name is generic, they won't be remembered or noticed as much.

    It's definitely a weird thing to do, and most people I know would probably view it negatively, but what do you all think?

    Anyone have experience?
     
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  3. Jul 18, 2012 #2

    Monique

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    I assume you're talking about your real name? I have a friend who changed her name (because of a family situation), she had to get permission from the Queen to do so. A criterium was that the family name was not allowed to exist.

    Another friend changed her first name and also wanted to change her last name (to avoid discrimination), but instead of getting permission from the Queen she married and adopted her husband's name :smile:

    I also know someone who went through a gender-reassignment and changed his name.

    There are numerous people who use a 'nickname', for instance the people who's name is Johnathan likely go through life as John or Nathan.

    It depends on what you want your unique name to be and how different it is from your current name.
     
  4. Jul 18, 2012 #3
  5. Jul 18, 2012 #4
    It sounds silly that in the year 2012 people have to get permission from a monarch to do something.
    Is it some kind of arbitrary screening process, just so people don't get outrageous names?
     
  6. Jul 18, 2012 #5
    Jimmy is a nice name.
     
  7. Jul 18, 2012 #6

    Monique

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    Not arbitrary at all, there is a list of rules that have to be met.

    To change the first name a person has to go to court with the help of a lawyer.

    To change a last name the ministry of Security and Justice judges whether the request for name change is eligible for treatment. Name changes happen by Royal Decree, which means that the Queen then signs the decision. The signature of the Queen is more of symbolic meaning. To change a last name because of psychological reasons, a psychiatric report is required. One can also change a name when it sounds foreign or because it is too common.
     
  8. Jul 18, 2012 #7
    Oh, so "permission from the queen" is just a way of signifying that entire process?
    That makes sense. I thought you meant you have to send a letter to the queen, and depending on whether she finds the name befitting a peasant in her kingdom, she will deign to grant the wish.
     
  9. Jul 18, 2012 #8

    Monique

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    Exactly, it still is quite special: it's not every day that you can have a document signed by the Queen.

    About the befitting of a name, here is a list of forbidden first names in the Netherlands (most are from before 1970): http://www.vernoeming.nl/geweigerde-voornamen

    Many are last names that were not allowed to be first names, some were forbidden for other reasons (some would be accepted today): Anarchistine, Ego, Glenn, Joey, Cinderella, Dionne, Savanna, Geisha, F, Jeanne d’Arc, Tom Tom. Funny to see that these days the names would not stand out that much.

    I know someone who's first name is Human :biggrin:

    Does the USA have regulations for name assignment? With the names I've heard come by I would assume not.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  10. Jul 18, 2012 #9

    jtbell

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    That would be un-American! :uhh:

    African-Americans in particular give their children distinctive names. At first I thought these were from collections of names in African languages, but it seems most of them are invented.

    http://www.salon.com/2008/08/25/creative_black_names/

    Another group that dotes on distintive names is Utah Mormons:

    http://wesclark.com/ubn/ (note particularly the essay "What's in a (Utah) Name?")
     
  11. Jul 18, 2012 #10

    phinds

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    Nah, too generic.

    Also, sounds like a safe-cracker.

    :rofl:
     
  12. Jul 18, 2012 #11
    Jimmy is a perfectly fine name. :tongue:

    Feynman was a good safe-cracker but he didn't use a jimmy. Maybe we can use his name for that.
     
  13. Jul 18, 2012 #12

    turbo

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    My mother had intended to name me Peter, but when the hospital staff showed up with the forms, she opted to name me after my father. Believe me, Harley was not a good name to be saddled with in the 50s. I don't know what came over her.
     
  14. Jul 18, 2012 #13
    I've slightly changed my name from Van de Carr to VandeCarr so as not to confuse computers. I'm a US citizen so I didn't have to ask the Queen. I have a Dutch ancestor who settled in present day Ulster County, New York in 1635. He spelled his name van der Karr.
     
  15. Jul 18, 2012 #14

    Monique

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    I found it very impolite and inconvenient for people in the US to butcher my name while I was living there. There appears to be a rule that a last name should and may only be composed of a single word.

    Even my first name people manage to misspell to Moniek, while only less than 2% of the Dutch Monique's spell the name that way.

    Btw, I wouldn't be surprised if your ancestor's real last name would've been "van de Kar", meaning "of/with the cart", indicating that the original name giver probably owned a cart :wink:
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  16. Jul 18, 2012 #15

    Danger

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    You know, the more often you say that the less true it becomes. :tongue:

    At least she named you after your father, not because his name was David...

    Good one.

    I shudder to think what he would have been named if he'd owned a moped.
    That's a mighty peculiar list you have there. Some of those things can't possibly be actual words in any language.

    Anyhow, all of the good alternative names have been taken—Zaphod Beeblebrox, Cranston Snord, Abercrombie Zirk, Julian Stumpwort... (those last two are pen names that I use when writing fiction)...

    One thing that people don't seem to realize is that no matter how a name is spelled, you can legally pronounce it any way that you choose to. For instance, although my first name is spelled "Daniel", it is properly pronounced "Supreme Master of Everything in the Known or Foreseeable Universe".
     
  17. Jul 18, 2012 #16

    DaveC426913

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    I remember the story of a guy named RB Jones.

    Could not get a credit card to save his life. The application kept being rejected with a request for full name spelled out - no initials. Finally, in frustration, he sent in the form as R (only) B (only) Jones.

    Finally he got approved for a credit card - under the name Ronly Bonly Jones...
     
  18. Jul 18, 2012 #17

    Monique

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    In American it would be Vandebromfiets :tongue: the name is still free, since no mopeds existed at the time. You can be the first!

    ha ha, I agree! I know people who insist on pronouncing their name with a foreign accent. You should pronounce mine with a distinguished French flare :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  19. Jul 18, 2012 #18
    I agree. I've gotten mail for Carr, deCarr, Decarr, Decar, Van, Vande, Van de Cart, and other permutations and combinations. That's why I combined it into one word. I have to say it worked. We Dutch people are practical if a bit stubborn and proud.

    You may be correct. We can document our American ancestors to about 1680 (after the English took over). We found Dirk van der Kar (or Karr) through Ancestors.com. I remember it was "der" instead of "de", but there may have been just one "r". There was no documentation. The later ancestors used "de."

    EDIT: I just saw this: Vandebromfiets. I like it. I'll have to contact your Queen. That could be my name when I visit The Netherlands..
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2012
  20. Jul 18, 2012 #19

    lisab

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    For extra flare, throw in an "r" and roll it :tongue2:!
     
  21. Jul 18, 2012 #20
    My first name is Preston, which doesn't really get any whiter than that, but it's distinct, and not really that weird, so I'm alright with it.
     
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