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Has anyone completed degrees without more math?

  1. Mar 17, 2017 #1
    So I'm working on my bachelor's right now, junior at UC Berkeley. I've been wondering if people could share their experiences in completing their degrees without any further math (past differentials, linear, multi variable calc.). I know more math isn't required, and I've been under the impression that the math we would need would be taught along with the physics (so far, I haven't had an issue yet, but I just started my upper divs). I am currently taking upper division linear algebra, but I don't like proofs, nor do I find abstract math particularly interesting. Can anyone elaborate on their experiences without more math please?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2017 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    I took math papers into my masters year so... but I do know people who did not take maths past their second year. The main difference is the mathematicians have a different take on how maths works which is useful for the more abstract disciplines.
    In the upper levels, though, I found I would outstrip the math students in any kind of mathematical modelling. Probably because physics covers that informally much earlier on.
     
  4. Mar 17, 2017 #3

    davenn

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    I remember back when working through my BSC in geology at least a couple of 1st year papers were a requirement
    my math abilities are dreadful :cry:

    a math requirement is obviously more important for a science degree than non -sci ones


    Dave
     
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