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Hawking to leave Cambridge in protest over budget cuts, heading to Perimeter

  1. Mar 2, 2010 #1

    rhody

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 2, 2010 #2
    Good, funding there is tight already as it is.
     
  4. Mar 3, 2010 #3
    Hawking... is... coming to... Ontario?

    wow.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2010 #4

    ZapperZ

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  6. Mar 3, 2010 #5

    rhody

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    This seems so cruel, you have a guy who takes 3 minutes to type a single sentence, while Hawking's grad student (Sam Blackburn) was running loose and free with his view, either in person or on a blog or website.

    Professional journalism seems to have broken down.

    If the info was posted on a blog or website, why would the "Daily Mail" run with it, without checking with Hawking or Blackburn first ?

    Rhody... :mad:
     
  7. Mar 4, 2010 #6

    f95toli

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    Because is it the Daily Mail and that is how they operate?
    Checking sources isn't exactly common practice among the journalists who work for British tabloids.
     
  8. Mar 4, 2010 #7

    rhody

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    OK, to take it to the next level, why would other media sources pick up on it, and not try to verify ? I got multiple google alerts about this ? Do they merely quote, the Daily Mail as the source, and leave it at that ? I don't have access to the alert history at the moment to see if that was the case or not. Maybe someone who IS employed by the media can address this, anyone ?

    P.S.

    Side Note: within 24 hours of my posting this thread, the google spider bot picked up on it and returned it as a new find, so anyone who is not a PF member but is searching on "Perimeter Institute" sees it, and this is how information, right or wrong spreads.

    Rhody...
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2010
  9. Jun 5, 2010 #8

    rhody

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    http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/June2010/05/c2121.html" [Broken]
    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  10. Jun 5, 2010 #9
    How much motor control does he still have? From what I read most recently, he currently operates his speaking machine with a single cheek muscle.
     
  11. Jun 5, 2010 #10

    rhody

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    Tubba,

    From what I understand, none, he uses device that allows him to spell words. IMHO, he is one tough hombre, not to mention a very good physicist too.

    Rhody...:smile:
     
  12. Jun 5, 2010 #11
    I suggest he stays where he is, Wateloo ain't nothing special. :rofl:
     
  13. Jun 5, 2010 #12
    He obviously controls the computer somehow. A couple of years ago I think he could flick his hands to signal it. And as I said, last I read he controls it with a single cheek muscle.
     
  14. Jun 5, 2010 #13
    ... One of the most influential cheek muscles in history! :smile:
     
  15. Jun 5, 2010 #14
    Hawking is a better physicist than I had realized.
     
  16. Jun 5, 2010 #15

    rhody

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    To all following this thread:
    and
    I for one am more interested in what research he will be doing, I will venture a wild guess, possibly discuss some black hole experiment that will settle once and for all if "Hawking Radiation" is real, and if it is agrees with his and Roger Penrose's predictions. If it is proven, then a Nobel Prize may be in his future, hopefully before his ALS takes its ultimate toll. I have a soft spot for Dr Hawking, been following him since the late 70's. Opps... that dates me, doesn't it.

    Rhody...
     
  17. Jun 5, 2010 #16
    Who do you guys think would replace him?
     
  18. Jun 5, 2010 #17
    Professor Stephen Hawking's website states the following:

    I've personally met Professor Hawking.:smile: He is one amazing and incrediable man!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  19. Jun 6, 2010 #18
    How could you possibly replace Stephen Hawking?
     
  20. Jun 6, 2010 #19
    Let me get this right. The contemporary world's most renowned scientist is leaving his post in protest over the weaning of his pet interest from the public tit. Is this correct?? I'd thought only children and adolescents had this sense of (what's the word?) righteous charity flowing their way.
     
  21. Jun 6, 2010 #20

    rhody

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    Phrak,

    First, like I said in my post I was speculating about his talks with the physicists at PI. Second, if you read the article in post #1, Hawking sees the progress of all of Physics (not just his pet interest) in Britain come to a near standstill for lack of funds. PI was founded mostly through private funding, because of the vision and determination of Mike Lazaridis, see http://www.perimeterscholars.org/pi-info.html", and came on-line in 2001.

    Have a look at what they are up to: http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/en/News/General/What%27s_New?/" [Broken]

    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  22. Jun 6, 2010 #21
    "In keeping with university policy, Prof. Hawking retired as the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University in 2009, the year he turned 67."
    http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/News/In_The_Media/Prof._Stephen_Hawking_to_be_officially_welcomed_on_june_20 [Broken]

    The above link(url) from Perimeter Institute provides a wealth of information about this topic. Have fun exploring it's website!:smile: A video to the right of the website does note that Hawking interests are in space, time and black holes.


    Rhody as the OP, the article you presented in post #1 is what I consider to be poor news reporting.

    I'd like to address your comment Rhody, "Hawking sees the progress of all of Physics (not just his pet interest) in Britain come to a near standstill for lack of funds." Well, there doesn't appear to be a lack of funds at Cambridge University.

    May 2010, Issue 12
    "Building the Future
    Vice-Chancellor Professor Alison Richard on how new buildings and refurbishments across the University are helping research to flourish."
    [Please read on . . .]
    http://www.research-horizons.cam.ac.uk/spotlight/-p-building-the-future--p-.aspx

    and

    "May 2010, Issue 12
    Probing the Universe: Kavli Institute for Cosmology
    Scientists at Cambridge’s Kavli Institute are studying how the Universe developed after the Big Bang by analysing light emitted up to 13.7 billion years ago.

    "It may be one of Cambridge’s newest buildings but its historic roots lie in one of the University’s oldest scientific research departments. The £4 million Kavli Institute for Cosmology Cambridge (KICC), opened in 2009, is built just yards from the University Observatory, where astronomical research has been carried out since the early 19th century. In the intervening years, Cambridge has developed an international reputation for ground-breaking discoveries about the origin, evolution and structure of the Universe, thanks to research in the Institute of Astronomy, the Department of Physics’ Cavendish Laboratory and the Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP).

    "The driving force for the new Institute was to bring together some of the groups from these departments, as Professor George Efstathiou, Director of KICC, explained: ‘The spread of research across departments owes much to the natural divisions that resulted from the diverse ‘tool boxes’ used to study different areas of cosmology, such as the events following the Big Bang, the birth of stars, the structure of the Universe and so on. Today, though, there are increasing overlaps and it makes sense to integrate research programmes where there is common ground.’

    "KICC is now home to 55 scientists, including many graduate students from each department, and is also recruiting a new generation of research scientists: Drs George Becker, Ian McCarthy and Carrie MacTavish are the first Kavli Institute Fellows to be appointed, funded by an endowment from The Kavli Foundation to pursue independent research in Cambridge."
    http://www.research-horizons.cam.ac...verse--kavli-institute-for-cosmology--p-.aspx
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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