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Heaven is hotter than Hell

  1. Oct 16, 2015 #1

    Svein

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    It is possible to make an accurate computation of the temperature of Heaven using a physical law called Stefan - Boltzmann law which gives the power radiated from a black body given its temperature. The clue as to the temperature of heaven follows from data available in the bible. Isiah 30:28 reads:

    "Moreover the light of the moon shall be as the light of the sun, and the light of the sun shall be sevenfold, as the light of seven days".

    Thus heaven receives from the moon as much radiation as we do from the sun and in addition seven times seven (i.e: 49 times) as much as earth does from the sun. This gives 50 times in all! This radiation falling on heaven heats it to the point where the heat loss by re-radiation θ just equals the heat received by radiation. So from Stefan - Boltzmann law 4'th power law we have
    [tex] (\frac{\theta}{T})^{4}=50[/tex]
    Taking T (the absolute temperature of earth) as 300K, we obtain a temperature of 798K, or about 525 Celsius. It is tempting to compare this unexpectedly warm temperature with that of Hell. Although we cannot be exact about the temperature of hell, we can conclude an upper limit. Revelations 21:8 reads:

    "But the fearful and unbelieving ... shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone ..."

    The boiling point of brimstone (sulphur) is 444.6 degrees C, which means that the temperature of such an eternal lake must be less than 444.6 degrees C (otherwise if would evaporate). Therefore, as 444.6 is much less than 525.0, we are forced to conclude by Physical and Biblical data, that:

    Heaven is hotter than Hell!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 16, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    Wouldn't that lead to 1 + 7 = 8 ?
     
  4. Oct 16, 2015 #3

    wolram

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell

    Punishment in Hell typically corresponds to sins committed during life. Sometimes these distinctions are specific, with damned souls suffering for each sin committed (see for example Plato's myth of Er or Dante's The Divine Comedy), but sometimes they are general, with condemned sinners relegated to one or more chamber of Hell or to a level of suffering.

    In many religious cultures, including Christianity and Islam, Hell is traditionally depicted as fiery and painful, inflicting guilt and suffering.[4][specify] Despite these common depictions of Hell as a place of fire, some other traditions portray Hell as cold. Buddhist - and particularly Tibetan Buddhist - descriptions of hell feature an equal number of hot and cold hells. Among Christian descriptions Dante'sInferno portrays the innermost (9th) circle of Hell as a frozen lake of blood and guilt.[5] But cold also played a part in earlier Christian depictions of hell, beginning with the Apocalypse of Paul, originally from the early third century;[6] the "Vision of Dryhthelm" by the Venerable Bede from the seventh century;[7] "St Patrick's Purgatory", "The Vision of Tundale" or "Visio Tnugdali", and the "Vision of the Monk of Enysham", all from the twelfth century;[8] and the "Vision of Thurkill" from the early thirteenth century.[9]
     
  5. Oct 16, 2015 #4

    WWGD

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    Wow, you've done your research!
     
  6. Oct 16, 2015 #5

    @ 1:18
     
  7. Oct 16, 2015 #6
    hehe, I thought that this was going to be a joke about the beautiful women you could have in heaven.
     
  8. Nov 2, 2015 #7

    davenn

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    and of course this all leads to this classic bit of text .....

    Is Hell Exothermic or Endothermic?
    As you study for exams, remember its not the quantity it's the quantity. And remember there is no substitute for pure unadulterated bull

    Dr. Schambaugh, of the University of Oklahoma School of Chemical Engineering, Final Exam question for May of 1997. Dr. Schambaugh is known for asking questions such as, "why do airplanes fly?" on his final exams. His one and only final exam question in May 1997 for his Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer II class was: "Is hell exothermic or endothermic? Support your answer with proof."

    Most of the students wrote proofs of their beliefs using Boyle's Law or some variant. One student, however, wrote the following:

    "First, We postulate that if souls exist, then they must have some mass. If they do, then a mole of souls can also have a mass. So, at what rate are souls moving into hell and at what rate are souls leaving? I think we can safely assume that once a soul gets to hell, it will not leave.

    Therefore, no souls are leaving. As for souls entering hell, let's look at the different religions that exist in the world today. Some of these religions state that if you are not a member of their religion, then you will go to hell. Since there are more than one of these religions and people do not belong to more than one religion, we can project that all people and souls go to hell. With birth and death rates as they are, we can expect the number of souls in hell to increase exponentially.

    Now, we look at the rate of change in volume in hell. Boyle's Law states that in order for the temperature and pressure in hell to stay the same, the ratio of the mass of souls and volume needs to stay constant. Two options exist:

    1. If hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls enter hell, then the temperature and pressure in hell will increase until all hell breaks loose.
    2. If hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until hell freezes over.
    So which is it? If we accept the quote given to me by Theresa Manyan during Freshman year, "that it will be a cold night in hell before I sleep with you" and take into account the fact that I still have NOT succeeded in having sexual relations with her, then Option 2 cannot be true...Thus, hell is exothermic."

    The student, Tim Graham, got the only A.

    -------------------

    http://www.pinetree.net/humor/thermodynamics.html


    Dave
     
  9. Nov 3, 2015 #8
    "As you study for exams, remember its not the quantity it's the quantity." [itex]A\land\neg A[/itex]???
     
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