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I Heavier hydrogen-like bound states?

  1. Nov 12, 2017 at 1:36 PM #1
    Before I begin, I would like to say what I am about to ask would require some sort of top-top-bottom bound state for it to function. Which (to my knowledge) has not been experimentally or theoretically predicted. Also, in case if you are wondering- no, this is not a homework question.
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    So, if we know that hydrogen exists, could we also hypothetically observe some sort of hydrogen-like state where there would be second generation quarks (charm and strange) or third generation quarks (top and bottom/truth and beauty) bound in a proton like state; with a muon or tau-lepton acting like an electron?*

    * Yes, I am aware of positronium bound states and exotic atoms (Introduction to Elementary Particles, Griffiths, page 169).
     
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  3. Nov 12, 2017 at 1:53 PM #2

    Orodruin

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    No. Baryon states involving second and third generation quarks decay very fast.
     
  4. Nov 12, 2017 at 4:14 PM #3

    mfb

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    Well, we couldn’t store it, but for very short times these systems could exist. ccc, ccs and sss can only decay via the weak interaction, that makes their lifetime long enough to bind a muon (or antimuon for sss) via the electromagnetic interaction. css would be neutral.

    Top quarks decay too fast to form hadrons, but bbb with an anti-tau might be possible.

    There is just no realistic way to produce any of these things.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2017 at 7:05 PM #4

    Vanadium 50

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    I'm with mfb. I figured the question of whether or not you have an atom is how many orbits you have before decay, and it seems to be nearly a billion. So I would call it an atom.
     
  6. Nov 13, 2017 at 1:01 AM #5

    Orodruin

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    It sounds to me that the OP wants to create large quantities and/or stable matter. My response should be read in that light.

    Furthermore, the ttb state mentioned in the OP does not exist in a meaningful way due to the top lifetime.

    Also taking into account to that that the OP wanted the state to include a mu or tau instead of an electron and you have serious production issues even if such a state could theoretically exist.
     
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