Heisenberg's Uncertainty principle

  • Thread starter Bassalisk
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  • #1
Bassalisk
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I am trying to understand fully the concept of this principle. But this uncertainty stuff confuses me. Can someone give me the link, or some material so I can work mathematics behind this mechanism.

Its not that principle it self is the problem, I have glimpse whats going on, but the mechanics of the uncertainty mechanism is confusing me. If it is possible, detailed and NOT general answer. I am kind of guy that wants to understand all, and not just accept it.


Thank you
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
QuantumClue
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I am trying to understand fully the concept of this principle. But this uncertainty stuff confuses me. Can someone give me the link, or some material so I can work mathematics behind this mechanism.

Its not that principle it self is the problem, I have glimpse whats going on, but the mechanics of the uncertainty mechanism is confusing me. If it is possible, detailed and NOT general answer. I am kind of guy that wants to understand all, and not just accept it.


Thank you

If you could explain what parts you don't understand, then maybe myself or someone else will go over it for you.
 
  • #3
Bassalisk
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If you could explain what parts you don't understand, then maybe myself or someone else will go over it for you.

I do not understand this uncertainty concept in general, i believe there is a mathematical background behind it.
 
  • #4
QuantumClue
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I do not understand this uncertainty concept in general, i believe there is a mathematical background behind it.

All it says is that if you confine a particle to a very accurate location, it will have a very unprecise trajectory. Say [tex]\Delta x[/tex] is a very precise location, so [tex]\Delta p[/tex] indicates a very unprecise momentum. This is a direct result of the experiments which are performed on a particle system. You try and locate a particle with a photon, and the photon locates it's position well, but a result of it will be an instanteous undefined momentum. And vice versa, it works also the other way around. So your expression in whole is [tex]\Delta x \Delta p[/tex] which is either equal or greater than plancks constant, which is [tex]\hbar[/tex].
 
  • #5
dextercioby
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I am trying to understand fully the concept of this principle. But this uncertainty stuff confuses me. Can someone give me the link, or some material so I can work mathematics behind this mechanism.

Its not that principle it self is the problem, I have glimpse whats going on, but the mechanics of the uncertainty mechanism is confusing me. If it is possible, detailed and NOT general answer. I am kind of guy that wants to understand all, and not just accept it.

Thank you

There's a statistical interpretation one can give to the mathematical relation. A useful read is Leslie Ballentine's article in the Review of Modern Physics from 1970. http://rmp.aps.org/abstract/RMP/v42/i4/p358_1
 
  • #6
Bassalisk
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Is this uncertainty stuff all consequence of lack of technology to determine those or consequence of nature? But this clears thing so far.

Thanks
 
  • #7
QuantumClue
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Is this uncertainty stuff all consequence of lack of technology to determine those or consequence of nature? But this clears thing so far.

Thanks

For people who still believe in determinism, one can still view the Uncertainty Principle as a lack of knowledge on the system, but one cannot say this is due to a lack of technology.
 
  • #8
Bassalisk
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Thanks
 
  • #9
The_Duck
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The uncertainty principle is a fundamental limit, not an artifact of poorly constructed measuring devices--it tells you what sorts of measuring devices are possible in principle.
 
  • #10
gunner
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If you need any more information, you could always reference "Fabric of the Cosmos" by Brian Greene.
 
  • #11
Fredrik
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This post proves the theorem and contains additional comments that you might find useful.
 
  • #12
Bassalisk
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This post proves the theorem and contains additional comments that you might find useful.


Thanks i will check this and those books out, you were all very helpful
 
  • #13
A. Neumaier
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I am trying to understand fully the concept of this principle. But this uncertainty stuff confuses me. Can someone give me the link, or some material so I can work mathematics behind this mechanism.

The mathematics is fully given in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncertainty_relation#Mathematical_derivations

The interpretation is that you cannot assign to a quantum particle position x more accurately than <x>+-Delta x and momentum p more accurately than <p>+-Delta p, where Delta x times
Delta p would be smaller than hbar/2. However, within these accuracy limits, you can (in principle).
 
  • #14
poeteye
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Pursuit of Knowledge
-- James Ph. Kotsybar

The world we know has a fuzzy border
at the limit of our best perception --
there’s more probability than order
and certainty is a misconception.

Simultaneity just seems absurd,
since Einstein’s explained relativity --
observers can’t know when they’ve seen or heard
an event, without subjectivity.

The very atoms of which we are made
partly reside in hidden dimensions --
there may be a multiverse unassayed
where we’ll lose nearly all our conventions,
but we must keep researching even though
we only find out how little we know.
 

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