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Here's a question for you on inertia

  1. Sep 1, 2011 #1
    here's a question for you on inertia
    "consider a hypothetical situation consisting of two charges +Q and +q,only the effect of electric field is taken under consideration,and there is no other interaction taking place,the force on q due to Q is f(Qq),the direction of this force is described by coulomb's law of electrostatics"
    if the charge particle q is taken away from Q in such a way that the force used in doing the same allows particle to resonate its state of motion,being produced in the presence of original force f(Qq) only,what will be the nature of mass q (negative or positive)?
    also consider that the transient time in making that resonance is negligible
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 1, 2011 #2

    Hootenanny

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    Re: inertia

    With you up to here.
    I'm afraid that you've lost me at this point. Perhaps you could elucidate further. What do you mean "resonate its state of motion"? And what do you mean the "nature of mass q"? By the last sentence I guess you re saying that the system is in a steady state?
     
  4. Sep 1, 2011 #3
    Re: inertia

    resonate in order to produce the similar state of motion it will have in presence of f(Qq) only,
    nature of mass(negative or positive)
     
  5. Sep 2, 2011 #4
    Re: inertia

    is there no one to reply or you can't solve this?
     
  6. Sep 2, 2011 #5
    Re: inertia

    I would be happy to help, but your question still does not make sense. Define all of your terms clearly and use proper English (correct punctuation goes a long way).
     
  7. Sep 4, 2011 #6
    Re: inertia

    in simple words
    "a charge Q gives q a particular state of motion by taking it from point A To B,if an external force is used to produce the same state of motion,then what will be the mass of q,considering the fact that transient time (to make that state happen) is negligible
     
  8. Sep 4, 2011 #7

    Ken G

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    Re: inertia

    The question is not well posed. To get the same motion, you need the same force, so that's the answer. That has nothing to do with mass or inertia.
     
  9. Sep 4, 2011 #8
    Re: inertia

    you are not understanding it
    what will be the resistance offered to that force if you give the same motion?
     
  10. Sep 4, 2011 #9

    Ken G

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    Re: inertia

    The way objects resist forces is innate to the object, inertia = mass. Thus, inertia has nothing to do with the force applied, those are two separate topics entirely. That's why your question is ill posed, you are essentially asking, if I have an apple, what is its banana?
     
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