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Hi why do many dyes who have a conjugated system of delocalized

  1. Sep 12, 2011 #1
    hi

    why do many dyes who have a conjugated system of delocalized electrons absorb, not a particular wavelenght, but often a whole range of wavelenghts?

    so if there is a dye, that absorbs let me say all wavelenghts between 640-680nm. how is this possible?
    for me, this would mean, that there are an infinite number of electron levels on which the delocalized electrons can jump on, which cannot be right or am I wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2011 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: absorption

    Absorbtion doesn't take place ONLY with electrons. Entire atoms and molecules can absorb photons. Also, there is often a "band" of energy ranges that electrons can occupy in a material when their atoms are bound together. No longer is it soley atomic orbitals.
     
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